Taking Herbalism and Mining as your two professions can be a lucrative way to level with the very stable and high prices of herbs and ore thus far in BfA. While rested, each mining and herbalism node will award nearly 4,000 experience points which makes it so that four to five herbalism or mining nodes is equivalent to one quest. If you have the Sky Golem mount for herbalism, you can pick herbs without losing mount speed. There are also enchantments for gloves that will increase the speed at which you can process the herbalism and mining nodes. These can be made rather easily by an enchanter and should be relatively inexpensive on the auction house. These enchants will pay for themselves with the time saved while herbing and mining. Remember to continue completing mining and herbalism quests while leveling up to increase the yield of each node making your herbalism and mining leveling experience exponentially more lucrative.
The Alliance are able to unlock the void elves (exiled blood elves who can tap into shadow magic, trained by Alleria Windrunner after her experiences on Argus), Lightforged draenei (draenei members of the Army of the Light who fought the Legion on Argus), Dark Iron dwarves (fire-blooded cousins of the in-game dwarves of Ironforge), and Kul Tiran humans (larger, more heavyset versions of the in-game humans of Stormwind).[6]

You can try joining a Discord server themed around the class you’re playing, how you like to play World of Warcraft (achievement hunting, dungeon-running, player-versus-player combat, etc.), or your location, to name a few examples. World of Warcraft also has player communities built directly into the game. Find a community themed for newbies, or whatever else you want, and you’ll have a great resource to go to with questions. You might even make a few friends (or fellow adventurers).
Unless Blizzard has some real story shake-ups and a phenomenally tuned raid on the horizon, I’m honestly expecting the sharpest player decrease to set in within the next few months. The expansion itself has some interesting ideas, but sticking to a World Quest grindfest is quickly becoming the norm, and the Island Expeditions aren’t exactly exciting.

Island expeditions require groups of three players to venture to islands with randomly spawned enemies and piles of AP. The island expedition ends once they collect a certain amount of AP, and they are granted about 300 AP as a reward — unfortunately, players don’t get any of the between 6,000 and 12,000 AP they collect during the expedition. These missions can take anywhere from three to 20 minutes, and never once offer any real challenge or depth.
The world quests aren’t necessarily bad, but they aren’t good either. I wouldn’t mind killing five of a type of monster or fighting one particular boss a few times, but after seven or eight, it starts to wear pretty thin. But going from levels in the mid-20s can take nearly 30,000 AP, so you’ll need more than world quests if you want to get your heart up in a reasonable time.
This expansion suffers from the Warlords of Draenor (WoD) effect, initially, players will think this is a great expansion but upon investing some time into the game they'll realize this game is a disaster. The pre-patch should have been our first warning with how poorly designed and executed that fiasco was, but beyond that, let's look at what the expansion itself offers:
What’s worse, it’s rarely satisfying when you do make it to a new milestone in your grind to unlock the gear you need. Legion had legendary items that changed the way an ability functioned, which would also completely change the way classes played; the Azerite traits in the Battle for Azeroth are rarely as interesting. Instead, they are simply passive bonuses that, in most cases, help you do more damage without any extra effort on your part. While some classes are lucky enough to have traits that change their gameplay slightly, Blizzard has so far seemed to favor nerfing those traits out of viability for most specs.

If you’d rather read than watch, there are also plenty of resources you can use to acclimate yourself to World of Warcraft, figure out what to do next, and ask questions when you’re feeling stuck. For the basics, we recommend reviewing Wowhead’s “Guide on How to Play World of Warcraft,” which is definitely worth scanning if you’re new to massively multiplayer online games or just want to get a sense of how Blizzard’s approach differs from others you’ve played.
At the end of Legion, the titan Sargeras was imprisoned, but not before he plunged his sword into the planet Azeroth. This not only devastated a massive area (much of the desert zone of Silithus is now cracked and scorched), but badly wounded the gestating titan inside. While the heroes managed to ablate the worst of the damage (at the cost of the majority of their artifact weapons' mythic power), the world is still wounded and bleeding a substance called "Azerite," which has great magical potential. The Horde Warchief, Sylvanas Windrunner, attempts to consolidate Horde power on Kalimdor and gain a monopoly on Azerite (which is primarily found at the southern end of the continent). Her campaign to do so, the War of Thorns, formed a pre-launch event for the expansion and ends with the major Night Elf holdings on the continent seized or (in the case of their capital city of Darnassus) annihilated. The Alliance makes a retaliatory strike against her home base, the Undercity, which was formerly the human capital of Lordaeron. This succeeds in driving the Horde out, but before leaving Sylvanas saturates the area with disease and toxins that render it uninhabitable. With this tit-for-tat military exchange, the Horde has almost complete control over Kalimdor, while the Alliance has near-total dominion over the Eastern Kingdoms.[4] With further conflict inevitable, Battle for Azeroth takes the two factions to the continents of Kul Tiras and Zandalar to recruit new allies in order to turn the tides of war.[4]
World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth focuses on the rivalry between the two most important factions of Azeroth, the Alliance and the Horde. The expansion adds two new continents (Zandalar and Kul TIras), divided into islands, where you can find new dungeons and raids, quests and previously unseen enemies, as well as six new playable races. Once again, the maximum experience level of the player characters increases (from 110 to 120). Battle for Azeroth also introduces two new game modes. In the first one, groups of three characters explore chosen maps and fight randomly assigned monsters and threats. In the other mode, groups of twenty characters each try to take over locations in strategic places for their factions.
If you’re a returning player, consider paying for a month’s worth of playing time—a mere $15—and using the game’s newer Class Trials to see if you still have that spark for higher-level play. While you can also go the “Starter Edition” route for a free, limited romp through Azeroth, you might need a little more than the newbie zones to help you decide whether you want to play through the game’s latest expansion.
My second most anticipated new feature in the Tides of Vengeance update is the Battle for Darkshore Warfront. It’s the second cyclical battle between the Horde and Alliance, in which each faction takes turns gathering resources, fighting in a pitched raid battle and then controlling the Darkshore zone. In what I hope will be an improvement to the Warfronts feature, the controlling faction will gain access to diverse world quests in the zones they control, rather than the “kill x of y” quests from when it first launched.
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