The expansion brings a major change to the PvP ruleset on each realm. Every realm by default only allows players to attack NPCs in the open world; players who wish to engage in world PvP now have a setting called "War Mode" that can only be toggled on or off in their faction's capital city (i.e. Stormwind for the Alliance and Orgrimmar for the Horde). While in War Mode, players have access to new talents and abilities, as well as a slightly accelerated rate of XP gain.[10] Characters with War Mode activated are only able to see other players with War Mode, unless in their own capital cities.
Changes were also made to levelling in earlier content with Legion's 7.3.5 patch. The level-scaling tech introduced in Legion not only be continued in the new continents of Kul Tiras and Zandalar, but was also be applied to content from prior expansions, allowing larger level brackets for lower level zones. Further, as previous expansions are now included in the base game, the level ranges for those expansions are now broadened, allowing players to spend more time leveling in preferred expansions and avoid others entirely. Some examples include a zone like Westfall having its level bracket (at 10–15 as of Legion) increased to 10–60, whilst continents such as Outland and Northrend sharing a 60–80 level bracket. The aim of this change is to encourage more player choice whilst levelling and to allow players to experience the full story of a particular zone without overlevelling the relevant quests.

Similar problems have risen in the leveling system, which automatically scales to the player’s level and equipment. For the most part, you’ll vaporize enemies more quickly as you gain power, but there are some weird dips. Many players complained they felt less powerful at level 119 than at level 110, a problem I experienced myself. And world PvP remains a strange and whacky world where level and class balance issues make wins and losses feel destined instead of earned.

In World of Warcraft®: Battle for Azeroth™, the seventh expansion to Blizzard Entertainment’s acclaimed massively multiplayer online role-playing game, the fall of the Burning Legion sets off a series of disastrous incidents that reignites the conflict at the heart of the Warcraft® saga. As a new age of warfare begins, Azeroth’s heroes must set out on a journey to recruit new allies, race to claim the world’s mightiest resources in order to turn the tides of war, and fight on several fronts to determine whether the Horde or Alliance will lead Azeroth into its uncertain future.
Taerar - Alliance Taerar - Horde Talnivarr - Alliance Talnivarr - Horde Tarren Mill - Alliance Tarren Mill - Horde Teldrassil - Alliance Teldrassil - Horde Temple noir - Alliance Temple noir - Horde Terenas - Alliance Terenas - Horde Terrordar - Alliance Terrordar - Horde The Maelstrom - Alliance The Maelstrom - Horde The Sha'tar - Alliance The Sha'tar - Horde The Venture Co. - Alliance The Venture Co. - Horde Theradras - Alliance Theradras - Horde Thrall - Alliance Thrall - Horde Throk'Feroth - Alliance Throk'Feroth - Horde Thunderhorn - Alliance Thunderhorn - Horde Tichondrius - Alliance Tichondrius - Horde Tirion - Alliance Tirion - Horde Todeswache - Alliance Todeswache - Horde Trollbane - Alliance Trollbane - Horde Turalyon - Alliance Turalyon - Horde Twilight's Hammer - Alli... Twilight's Hammer - Horde Twisting Nether - Alliance Twisting Nether - Horde Tyrande - Alliance Tyrande - Horde Terokkar - Alliance Terokkar - Horde Thermaplugg - Alliance Thermaplugg - Horde
On my server, I can usually craft cards for around $2000/card and decks average for about 25k/deck (average selling price of all 4 decks) . The average profit per deck is around 9k gold, and I can process (on average) 9ish decks per hour. This means that the average gold generation rate of processing linen and herbs is about 80k gold per hour. That also leaves you with a massive pile of red pigments that you can AFK craft to scrolls for extra profit. (Crimson pigments gets generated at 75 pigment/min for "free" when milling for Viridescent, there is an extra 500ish gold per minute of profit when AFK-crafted to scrolls, that's not insignificant)
I know if you aren't using hunters than you'll really want the loot-a-rang for easy looting, so that would take up one of your professions. In all honesty If i was going to do it id level up a hunter team and only hyperfarm with them, while doing other things with the mains. As far as regular professions go, they don't really seem worth it anymore like they did back in the old days, so I'd personally stick with gathering stuff as you are hitting nodes x5
Thing is, as in real life, opportunity cost is the real key on this. I'm getting 2 tokens per month quite easily with just 3 toons (1 maxed only (yeah, pretty damn inefficient but I lack a lot of time to play :p)) just by flipping couple of things, food, flask, potions, bags, shirts (yeah, shirts!!), etc etc. Every damn penny/gold counts :p, just have to learn how your realm market works, what niches exist, which items are needed and undersupplied and which are oversupplied.
The expansion brings a major change to the PvP ruleset on each realm. Every realm by default only allows players to attack NPCs in the open world; players who wish to engage in world PvP now have a setting called "War Mode" that can only be toggled on or off in their faction's capital city (i.e. Stormwind for the Alliance and Orgrimmar for the Horde). While in War Mode, players have access to new talents and abilities, as well as a slightly accelerated rate of XP gain.[10] Characters with War Mode activated are only able to see other players with War Mode, unless in their own capital cities.
Professions are skills used to create and enhance items (gears). You will start with one skill once your character has learned a profession. When you use the profession, your skill will increase. A profession’s higher skill will allow you to create more powerful items. If you change a primary profession, you will lose any skill you have made with your original profession. So it is important to choose your primary professions wisely.
A: The gold value of a Token will be determined dynamically based on supply and demand. When you put a Token up for sale, you’ll be quoted the amount of gold you’ll receive upon a successful sale. If you then decide to place the Token up for sale, that amount is locked in, and the gold will be sent to your mailbox after another player purchases your Token.

Valid pieces for Azerite empowerment are available for the chest, shoulder, and head slots of all classes. This equipment has multiple tiers of that can be unlocked, represented by a series of concentric wheels with icons representing individual powers; as individual powers are selected, they rotate into slots at the top of the interface, activating the selected benefit and locking out the others unless the player pays to reset their decision. Outer rings offer multiple choices, some based around the character's class and specification, others around the zone or circumstances in which the gear was acquired. The innermost circle offers no such options, instead being a boost to the level of the item itself, and thus providing a flat all-around benefit.
I'm aware that the LS chain can be xmuted up all the way up from GIO. This is great since it means ultimately you only need to track/acquire one item. The procs can certainly increase your profit margin, but as I said in my top-level comment the profitability of the whole endeavor is server-dependent. These numbers will of course vary from server to server, and for some it might be worth it. 

Don't get me wrong, I'm not turning my nose at people who struggle to do well (I'm not exactly a mastermind myself), but the legion expansion has made people lazy in terms of finding their jackpot system. We need to get used to gold making going from the "all for all" system to the current "all for one" system and the first step is understanding that the WoW economy is never decidedly made good or bad as if it somehow exists along the same lines as class design and gameplay mechanics.
Inscription and darkmoon decks remain highly profitable still as long as you approach it with the right mindset and understand that it is a commodity market and the goal is not necessary to sell crafted decks. For me, it's an exercise in managing purchasing Linen & Herbs below market, balancing opportunity cost of converting linen to expulsom, and mass purchasing underpriced individual cards and relisting them at a profit but under the crafting cost so that they move. That's the primary goal, and you naturally complete decks that you sell but you don't go out of your way for.
Allied races aren’t much better. You can only earn them by grinding out reputation. It doesn’t take that long but casual players will need to invest a couple weeks primarily to it, and focusing on that grind will take you away from others, like earning gear. Each race has its own grind, but the things you do to work through it remain the same, adding to your boredom.
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