When you launch the game you can choose from two opposite factions (Alliance and Horde), 7 different races for each factions and 6 different classes with very wide mixture of the character's appearance. World of Warcraft play involves the completion of quests while traveling through the story line, gaining experience from the quests to level up the characters and picking up the useful loot to trade with other players. Once a player feel strong enough, or simply just wishes to find some better items, players can visit dungeons where a group can fight together to get better loot from stronger monsters. Near end-game the biggest dungeons require a raid with up to forty players to face and accomplish the hardest challenges for the most valuable items. Another big part of the game is the Player vs Player (PvP) fights where gamers can play againts each other in 2vs2, 3vs3 arenas or battlegrounds for PvP rewards.
I think what you're actually talking about when you say "niche" is the barrier to entry for new players. It sounds like you're worried that new players can pick up crafting professions and compete easier than before. Again, I'd say that the alpha build info in the OP looks pretty much the same as the current expansion. The true barrier to entry isn't the ability to level the profession quickly, it's actually recipe ranks. Some really good examples of this in the current expansion are rank 3 bracers, rank 3 flasks, and rank 3 felwort. It takes a certain level of investment to get those ranks, and the goblin activities related to those crafts simply aren't profitable/competitive without rank 3.
The Alliance are able to unlock the void elves (exiled blood elves who can tap into shadow magic, trained by Alleria Windrunner after her experiences on Argus), Lightforged draenei (draenei members of the Army of the Light who fought the Legion on Argus), Dark Iron dwarves (fire-blooded cousins of the in-game dwarves of Ironforge), and Kul Tiran humans (larger, more heavyset versions of the in-game humans of Stormwind).[6]
"Since [patch] 7.3.5 we’re happy with the overall pace of leveling, he said. "If you’ve chosen to start a brand new character right at the end of an expansion, getting a character fully leveled up and geared up to complete endgame content before the expansion ends, there’s always going to be some time pressure there. That’s just part of the nature of choosing to do that at that stage in time."
The hexweave bags are still a safe bet unless the new 32 crafting cost is like 10% of them. The one thing I'm more concerned about is the professions squish. This will make the old world items that we've been selling (TBC Dust still sells by 200 stacks easily) only required for Transmog and not leveling. This was a better option for a lot of professions (especially enchanting). Expecting their near-death with the next expansion. :(
This expansion suffers from the Warlords of Draenor (WoD) effect, initially, players will think this is a great expansion but upon investing some time into the game they'll realize this game is a disaster. The pre-patch should have been our first warning with how poorly designed and executed that fiasco was, but beyond that, let's look at what the expansion itself offers:
Eventually, the Alliance finishes its preparations and launches an attack on the Zadalari capital of Dazar'zalor, their goal being to sever the budding alliance between the Zandalari and the Horde by dismantling the Golden Fleet and capturing King Rastakhan. Despite Anduin and Jaina's desire to capture him alive, Rastakhan is overwhelmed by the power of his pact with the Loa Bwonsamdi, and the Alliance champions are forced to slay him. Enraged by Rastakhan's death, Horde champions launch a vicious counterattack on the withdrawing Alliance forces, which ends with both Jaina and High Tinkerer Mettatorque gravely wounded. As the Alliance leadership debates their next move, Sylvanas, infuriated by the Horde's defeat, resurrects Jaina's long dead brother Derek Proudmoore as a Forsaken, an act that horrifies the surviving Horde leaders, with the intent to use him as a sleeper agent to destroy the Proudmoore family from within.
This top-end difficulty was missing entirely from Legion’s first raid, Emerald Nightmare, which was cleared by top guilds in around 11 hours. Meanwhile the first guild to clear Uldir’s hardest difficulty, Mythic, spent somewhere around 70 hours attempting to kill the raid’s eight bosses. Even after all that time, the guild, Method, still had members say they loved the raid, and that it was one of their favorite in recent memory.
When it comes to farming and acquiring stashes of gold, perhaps the first thing that comes to mind is doing raids or dungeons. That sounds great, but there are a few issues. First and foremost, it'd be virtually impossible to solo new content for maximum profit. Then, being in a group means that the earned gold is split and you're only getting a fraction of what you could be getting if you were on your own. Last but not least, finding reliable and good groups for raids and dungeons might prove to be quite the challenge.
DMF Cards the first ~72 hours of the expansion. Every deck was selling for 500k-750k after 24 hours, so I spent all the time I had and just shuffled bracers info expulsum. Constantly spammed trade that I was buying herbs at just about every price, and just went to town. Once the weekend hit (Friday), I sold my last few decks (made 44 total in those 3 days I think), and listed all my leftover cards on the AH at a decent cut.

Sky golem is all profit if you do the smart thing and run old panda farms on multiple toons. Was running 10 farms at one point till bfa launched and was upto my eyeballs in trillium and Ghost iron. Just not been doing it lately, but those 10 farms was an hour a day if that and sustained 4 crafters and alchemists though could have sustained 8 easily.
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