The recruit also grants the recruiter levels, with the latter gaining one level for every two levels the recruit gains. There are a lot of rules and restrictions to that, however. It all basically boils down to leveling alternate characters together. The recruiter can even earn epic mounts and battle pets if you stick with the game for a couple months.
The expansion allows players to level up to level 120, an increase from the level cap of 110 in the previous expansion Legion.[1] Initially, there will be ten dungeons included with 8.0 with Mythic Plus versions of the dungeons and the first raid, Uldir, being available soon after the game's release. Following the beginning of preorders and the release of four allied races in January 2018, the number of character slots per server was raised from 12 to 16; with the launch of the expansion in August, it was raised to 18, to make room for the two additional races unlocked with initial content. The number of available bag slots in the player's backpack, which has been fixed at 16 slots since the game's release in 2004, will also receive an increase if an authenticator is attached to an account.

No he's just not paying attention. The wanted quests are built into both the leveling guides and the "Zandalar Forever" achievement guide. They aren't in the rep guide because they are not repeatable and by the time you hit max level they should be done. You'll also notice the rep guide doesn't contain every single possible completable quest that rewards rep. It is designed to focus on repeatable objectives, world quests, large quest lines, and missions.
-Gameplay- Gameplay has largely been stripped down to be a shell of its former self. This trimming has been going on for several expansions, but now it's even worse. Classes only have so many buttons which has resulted in very little skill involved in PvE (even PvP is a faceroll for most melee, lacking any sort of depth and decision-making as it's pretty clear what buttons to press in any given situation) and it's become more of a gear check. This expansion gave zero new abilities to classes, only took them away.
This week, the story began: A short series of quests begin to pit Alliance and Horde against each other, and the skirmishes over territory that will soon be destroyed began. Realistically, that meant players had about 20-30 minutes of questing, at which point (without any in-game announcement or breadcrumbs) four world quests opened up in an existing contested zone.

The downside is that War Mode will make you vulnerable to other players, which means you might be killed more often. Whether it’s worthwhile will depend on the zones you’re visiting and how active the other faction is on your server cluster. Heavily populated realms usually mean more players on both sides, and more conflict, but on quieter realms, you may rarely run across an enemy.
Do quests and complete the story of your first chosen area before returning to your capital to scrap all of the equipment items you acquired. You should be around Level 113 by the time you complete your first area. Before selecting your second zone, head to your faction hub ship to acquire your introductory quests to the mission table and your champions. Complete this introduction and then pick up the quest to establish your first foothold in enemy territory.
As late as possible. Early on, you’ll want to follow the missions in Battle for Azeroth right up until you get the option to send a follower on a two-hour long quest. As soon as you get there, stop doing the War Campaign missions. You can come back to them once you have reached something like 119 and a half and finish leveling with those if you want. If you don’t use these missions to cap off your leveling journey, then they’re the first thing you’ll want to do once you reach max level.
-Island Expeditions- Island expeditions was one of the new features I was looking forward to but Blizzard no longer makes games that are ready when they are ready but rather makes games ready when the deadline comes. Thus, many of the new features are completely stripped down from what was expected and it's literally just a small scenario you enter with two other players to continue to grind out your Azerite neck piece.

The idea of the expansion came up after the heroes of Azeroth dealt with so much external threats like the Burning Legion. In their own words, "so when we talk about what's the biggest threat in this world, is it the titan or is it the dwarf paladin that put a hammer in that titan's head"? As such, the enemy (at least during the early parts of the scenario) will be the opposite faction, a "vast army of world-destroying forces".[4]
Each of those modes existed long before this latest expansion; raiding is a basic concept in MMOs, and Mythic+ was added in World of Warcraft’s last expansion. The problems with Battle for Azeroth’s endgame come from the systems it adds, which most often artificially gate progress where most of the fun can be found. If raids and Mythic+ are the carrot, we’re about to talk about the stick.
This expansion suffers from the Warlords of Draenor (WoD) effect, initially, players will think this is a great expansion but upon investing some time into the game they'll realize this game is a disaster. The pre-patch should have been our first warning with how poorly designed and executed that fiasco was, but beyond that, let's look at what the expansion itself offers:
If we consider a group of players, the squad has three main roles: “tank”, fighter and healer. Warrior can be a great “tank”, in other words, the defender. “Tanks” are very hardy and can absorb a large amount of damage, but their main task – divertenemy’s attention from more vulnerable members of the group. Magicians, mentioned above – are the characters that cause a lot of damage. Priests, whose vocation is to heal the suffering, cannot inflict significant damage, compared to other classes, but their role is difficult to overestimate, because they help colleagues to survive, using their knowledge of healing.
Then 8.0 came along and turned everything on its head. Most of the techniques and shortcuts discovered, after 7.3.5 introduced scaling, were nerfed into oblivion. Many of the old techniques were confirmed by myself, first hand, to no longer work. I'm hoping that this thread can serve a similar purpose as the old thread, and gather as much data as possible on the fastest methods under the new system, and facilitate as many different perspectives and opinions on speed leveling with constructive discussion. I've just finished leveling to 110 under 8.1 with the exp curve.
The zone you start in isn't under your control, in as much as it's pre-selected for you based on your race. But for leveling purposes we want to make scaling work for us as much as possible. That means sticking to the lower level zones. Even though scaling will increase the level of the quests and mobs in those zones, the layout and design of them is built for a player with no mount. So you'll blaze through them and gain more exp/hour than higher level zones which assume you DO have a mount.
Today, I finally found out what the real problem was. I have always had the "Enable Zone Map" feature off, but noticed that I had "Enable Auto Zoom" still enabled. I assumed if you turned the map off, the auto zoom would just automatically not do anything. Turns out, every time I moved, the auto zoom was still collecting information and 'zooming' a map that didn't exist. I've turned it off now and my game is perfect - not a single slowdown. The difference is dramatic.
Gold for riding training. Travel time is a SIGNIFICANT time sink while using quests to level. You don't want to wait to get it. In fact, while questing, the second you ding 40/60/70/80 you'll want to hearth and train it IMMEDIATELY! 10304 gold is the base cost, which will be modified by reputation. Also, make sure you're in a guild with the 10% riding speed bonus unless you're a class that already gets a mount-speed buff.
Despite the fact that World of Warcraft still relies on the old 14-year-old game engine, the game can cause some frame rate drops even on newer hardware equipment. So we've decided to devote a lot of time and space to answer such questions like: How to set up the graphical options? What should I do to make sure that WoW runs smoothly? WoW's hardware requirements have evolved over the years due to graphical improvements, so find out if your computer can handle the highest graphics settings of the game.
Special note: At 110 it's almost certainly worthwhile to go and immediately get your Heart of Azeroth and first piece of Azerite gear from the BfA opening quest. It doesn't take long and provides pretty high power levels. I'd then return to Legion quests until 111 or even 112, since the power of these items will increase your kill speed significantly over the scaled enemies of BfA content.
Some quests in my guide are marked as "SKIP" and colored in red.  These quests are simply either too hard to solo or not worth the XP/time and are skipped.  My guide will only list SKIPPED quests if the quest is a direct follow up after completing a quest, not one that you have to click the NPC again to get it.  If you hover over the skipped quests, it will give info on why it is skipped in the guide (unless that info is already listed directly in the guide text).
“That’s the impetus behind everything, is to just make sure that players feel like things that they do in the game will have great consequences or great victories or whatever it’s going to be, right? Ultimately, our job is to create a world and environment and mechanics that support all that stuff. And however the players choose to make their choices is really up to them.”
This week, the story began: A short series of quests begin to pit Alliance and Horde against each other, and the skirmishes over territory that will soon be destroyed began. Realistically, that meant players had about 20-30 minutes of questing, at which point (without any in-game announcement or breadcrumbs) four world quests opened up in an existing contested zone.
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