The prepatch is just a patch, at the end of the day. The expansion is yet to come. But this significant stumble causes me to pause and contemplate what we're getting when BfA hits. Will AI-infused Islands and massive PvE Warfronts represent enough new gameplay? Or will the new zones just feel like an in-game content patch (Argus, say, for Legion players) on steroids?

As for the classes themselves, they almost all play like slower and slightly less interesting versions of their Legion counterparts. This is thanks in large part to the loss of one ability from each class that came along with Legion’s own AP dumping system: the artifact weapon, which added a unique ability to every spec in the game. The loss of these abilities left most classes feeling frustrating and incomplete, and though Azerite gear was supposed to be the replacement, it missed the mark completely. There will always be one Azerite trait that reigns supreme for each spec, meaning that the frustration of that particular loop will be unavoidable as long as the system is in the game.

And if anything, this addon is more legit than an addon such as auctioneer. You can effectively set auctioneer up to auto purchase or at least auto prompt you to buy out items within a price range you specify - that's far more automation (rescanning the AH once per second, automatically informing you of deals with a buyout option button ready to be clicked, etc) than Zygor's does.
But compare that with BfA's lackluster prepatch. Last week, players' uber-powerful Artifact weapons, which they had spent the entire Legion expansion building up, abruptly burnt out with no in-game explanation, no storyline, no quest, no Dad jokes from Khadgar, just a line of text on the Artifact screen saying they had been sacrificed to help stop the destruction of the world--part of the ending quests for Legion.
I personally wouldn't recommend Bloodmyst Isle. There's a ton of quests but a lot of those quests have absolutely horrible drop rates on their items. A lot of the quest mobs also have very slow and/or spread out spawns so if there's other people there you're gonna be waiting for respawns or spending a lot of time traveling between spawn areas quite a bit. Overall it's just an incredibly slow zone as far as EXP goes.
The power of items depends on their item level, which you can see on the item's tooltip; the higher the level, the better an item will be. However, the Warforging and Titanforging system - introduced in the Warlords of Draenor expansion - means that almost any item of Uncommon, Rare or Epic quality has a chance to ‘forge' to higher than its base item level: Warforging is up to +15, Titanforging is up to +45.
The prepatch for Battle for Azeroth first hit on July 17th, but the first real pieces of story weren't available until this week (more on that in a minute). The storyline is called the War of the Thorns, and it's intended to hype up the faction-vs.-faction conflict that makes up the core of BfA. Instead, it feels like it's sucking the air out of the room.
Azerite equipment is currently balanced around being able to unlock the outermost, earliest tier of power immediately upon acquisition, while delaying further advancement until the Heart has been further empowered. For example, the first piece of Azerite equipment, gained shortly after the Heart itself, is fully empowered once the Heart of Azeroth has reached level 3. A character at 120 (the maximum for the expansion) may find a piece whose first tier requires the Heart to have grown to level 12 or greater.
These guides are completely automated and work in-game, so you can see step-by-step instructions as you play. The guides automatically move to a new step as you complete the quests. You are told where to go i.e. the questgivers for accepting and turning in quests along with where and how to complete the quests. Zygor has more steps and details, which would be more suited to beginners. Dugi condenses the info into fewer steps, but still has all the necessary questing info.
Sometimes that requires players to earn gear to give them greater powers that they haven’t yet unlocked. That sense of progression is at the center of what makes World of Warcraft great and so successful over the last 14 years. There should always be a balance between gaining gear and strength through lower-level content and taking on the hardest challenges the game has to offer. With Battle for Azeroth, Blizzard has missed the mark. Getting to elite status just requires grinding content that isn’t fun, instead of players demonstrating their skills.
Prepare the Horde for war by recruiting the ancient empire of Zandalar. In this troll-dominated territory, ancient evil waits to be unleashed on the world as you battle crazed blood-troll worshippers, gargantuan dinosaurs, and titan constructs. Discover Zuldazar, the oldest city in Azeroth; unveil the bleak swamps of Nazmir; and traverse the deadly deserts of Vol'dun.
These things happen during prepatches. There are always kinks to work out, and typically those kinks are offset by the items and experiences players receive during the prepatch events themselves. The vast list of bugfixes demonstrates just how doggedly Blizzard developers are playing whack-a-mole with in-game issues. But in the past few expansions, it's become a bit of a trade: Hang with us during the rough patch and we'll reward you with goodies and some seriously overpowered, fun gameplay, Blizzard seems to say.
Allied races aren’t much better. You can only earn them by grinding out reputation. It doesn’t take that long but casual players will need to invest a couple weeks primarily to it, and focusing on that grind will take you away from others, like earning gear. Each race has its own grind, but the things you do to work through it remain the same, adding to your boredom.
Azeroth paid a terrible price to end the apocalyptic march of the Legion’s crusade—but even as the world’s wounds are tended, it is the shattered trust between the Alliance and Horde that may prove hardest to mend. As this age-old conflict reignites, gather your allies and champion your faction’s cause—for Azeroth’s future will be forged in the fires of war.
Azerite equipment is currently balanced around being able to unlock the outermost, earliest tier of power immediately upon acquisition, while delaying further advancement until the Heart has been further empowered. For example, the first piece of Azerite equipment, gained shortly after the Heart itself, is fully empowered once the Heart of Azeroth has reached level 3. A character at 120 (the maximum for the expansion) may find a piece whose first tier requires the Heart to have grown to level 12 or greater.
A "stat squish" and "item squish" was implemented to lower the numbers used in the game, e.g. a legendary item previously with a level of 1000 reduced to 265. Unique class-specific buffs are added back, i.e. mages' Arcane Brilliance and priests' Mark of Fortitude. Titanforging—a random event that raises the initial item level of an item gained via drops or rewards—is still in the game; however, if the item is one of those affected by the Heart of Azeroth, then that item cannot be titanforged.

Incursions are a new world content activity that are unlocked when one character has unlocked World Quests. This feature is unlocked account-wide meaning that all characters on that account can access Incursions even without being Level 120. This provides for a lucrative experience acquisition method that is available in a similar pattern to what Legion Invasions offered with nearly an entire level earned by completing an Incursion series which involves four World Quests and one mini-scenario at the end. These also grant item level 370 weapons and Azerite armor, so they should be done any time they are up. Incursions follow a similar schedule to Invasions and are available for 20 hours once they are initiated.
That lack of storytelling agency may soon change with Patch 8.1, Tides of Vengeance, which is coming to Battle for Azeroth soon. While there are plenty of fun gameplay changes that should make the expansion better, one of the most interesting additions is that of choice. In an upcoming quest, players will be able to choose whether they want to support Saurfang or Sylvanas — essentially honor or evil — in the struggle for Horde warchief.
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