We’re also big fans of Simple Armory, which gives you a similar look at your overall progression acrosss the entire game, as well as a gorgeous, detailed graphical listing of all the achievements you’ve unlocked and all the mounts, companions, pets, and toys you’ve collected. The site makes it incredibly easy to see what you still have to get, if you’re a completionist. If you’re looking to fill out your collection of mounts, the site will even create a handy, optimized guide of how you should spend your day (or week) adventuring to acquire them all.
In addition, you'll want to pick up leg and shoulder enchants and have them in your bags. These enchants have a level requirement of 80/85, but can't be placed on items above iLVL 136. You can get around this by having a level 85-100 character apply the enchant before mailing it to the character you're leveling, thus getting use of the enchants before level 85. I've personally confirmed that this works.

You earn a large rested experience bonus when you log out in this rest areas. This gives you a massive 200-percent bonus to experience gain from most actions (though experience from quests isn’t included). The amount of rested experience you earn increases the longer you’re logged off, and your experience bar will be blue (instead of purple) while you have the bonus.
Two new raids coming after the initial update differ drastically in size and content, depending on which side of the war you’re on. The Battle of Dazar’alor raid sees Alliance players trying to take over a city, but if you’re part of the horde, your version will see you try to defend it. Once you’ve beaten it once, you can then play the other side. The Crucible of Storms raid, on the other hand, is smaller and only consists of two bosses.
War Mode, which allows players on PvE realms to turn on PvP combat and PvP realm players to turn it off, launched--offering a fairly measly 10% extra experience to leveling players for the privilege of getting ganked by max-level characters, or 10% increased world quest rewards for level-capped characters. For many players, that's not much an enticement.
Darkmoon Faire: The Darkmoon Faire comes around once a month and provides two ways of bonus XP. You can ride the carousel to get the “Whee!” buff (10% bonus XP for one hour). You can also get the Darkmoon Top Hat by playing a few games, which gives you 10% bonus XP but only works during the Darkmoon Faire. Both of these are generally not worth it for the most part, as you spend more time running to get the buff than you gain in XP when leveling.
Both guides have a different look. Many players choose the Zygor guide because of the way it looks, with it’s modern, clean appearance. Zygor has improved it, so its easier to navigate. Dugi Guides interface blends into the game more, as it looks more like something you would find within World of Warcraft. It has icons down the right hand side for selecting your guides and is really easy to navigate.
The bones of Mythic+ are fairly simple, but it’s that simplicity that makes it Battle for Azeroth’s most rewarding mode. It’s fun, generally only takes about 40 minutes per dungeon and allows small groups of players to push themselves exactly as hard as they’d like. Battle for Azeroth’s dungeons are extremely well-designed and consistently entertaining, even after doing some of them 20-plus times, which makes the challenge of Mythic+ a great way to keep people playing.
Dugi and Zygor both had their guides updated before Mist of Pandaria was released and both guides are kept updated with all the patches and changes to the game. Dugi is way faster with updates and has a lot more. Zygor seems to hold out and then do a big update. With new content such as guides etc, Dugi is definitely leading the way with Zygor usually many months behind. Zygor now offers the same number of guides as Dugi but it took them a long time to catch up.
Set sail for the previously unmapped isles of Azeroth. Battle in groups of three as you race against cunning rival intruders—or enemy players—to collect the island’s resources. Constantly evolving challenges await as you traverse frozen landscapes near Northrend, open the mysterious gates of an abandoned Gilnean castle, navigate a war between elementals and more.
If you’d rather read than watch, there are also plenty of resources you can use to acclimate yourself to World of Warcraft, figure out what to do next, and ask questions when you’re feeling stuck. For the basics, we recommend reviewing Wowhead’s “Guide on How to Play World of Warcraft,” which is definitely worth scanning if you’re new to massively multiplayer online games or just want to get a sense of how Blizzard’s approach differs from others you’ve played.
-New dungeons- About 3/4 are fairly decent, not too long not too short, but none of them are compelling, none make me say to my friends and guildies, "Hey, let's do this instance, I love the theme and encounters." They're dull but tolerable. The other 1/4 of the dungeons just aren't fun and you will groan when you get a mythic Keystone for the Underrot, the snake temple, or Waycrest Manor. Waycrest Manor is actually one of the better dungeons, however, with the new Infested affix, Waycrest Manor suffers from many game-breaking bugs that end in the entire instance being pulled due to doors not properly working as intended.
If you love running old content for transmog items, you'll love the new legacy loot system. Whenever a player enters a dungeon or raid where they are 10 or more levels above the content, the dungeon or raid bosses drop an amount of loot equivalent to what would have dropped for a full group when the content was current. That means players could earn loot for five people in dungeons and loot for 20 people after soloing a raid. The legacy loot system also drops other gear types, like cloth dropping for a plate wearer. It's now much easier to get the transmog gear you want, and you can also collect gear for your alts on the same run. 
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