Professions: This may seem strange for a leveling guide, but the first opportunity you get, pick up both the Mining and Herbalism gathering professions. Not only will this allow you to track many various quest objectives on your map, but you also get a fair amount of experience whenever you gather. I'd put it at around 10% of a quest turn-in per gather. Since most of your wasted time in WoW is travel time, stopping to gather ore or herbs can keep your exp/h rolling as long as you don't go too far out of your way. You should only gather if it's convenient, and on the way to an actual quest objective. Don't make gathering your priority.
Set sail for the previously unmapped isles of Azeroth. Battle in groups of three as you race against cunning rival intruders—or enemy players—to collect the island’s resources. Constantly evolving challenges await as you traverse frozen landscapes near Northrend, open the gates of an abandoned Gilnean castle, navigate a war between elementals and more. Tides of Vengeance adds two new Island Expeditions to the mix and two new random events, as well as updated rewards.
World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth focuses on the rivalry between the two most important factions of Azeroth, the Alliance and the Horde. The expansion adds two new continents (Zandalar and Kul TIras), divided into islands, where you can find new dungeons and raids, quests and previously unseen enemies, as well as six new playable races. Once again, the maximum experience level of the player characters increases (from 110 to 120). Battle for Azeroth also introduces two new game modes. In the first one, groups of three characters explore chosen maps and fight randomly assigned monsters and threats. In the other mode, groups of twenty characters each try to take over locations in strategic places for their factions.

The tail end of Legion saw the introduction of Allied Races, which introduced two new races for each side to play as. Battle for Azeroth introduces more, with Dark Iron Dwarves and brown-skinned Orcs included in the upcoming choices. Blizzard hasn't confirmed much about what other kinds of races might show up, but there's plenty of datamined info out there for those who want to take a look. Allied Races start at level 20 after a short scenario and players can earn a special set of cosmetic armor if they level the character all the way to 1110 without buying a level boost.


-New dungeons- About 3/4 are fairly decent, not too long not too short, but none of them are compelling, none make me say to my friends and guildies, "Hey, let's do this instance, I love the theme and encounters." They're dull but tolerable. The other 1/4 of the dungeons just aren't fun and you will groan when you get a mythic Keystone for the Underrot, the snake temple, or Waycrest Manor. Waycrest Manor is actually one of the better dungeons, however, with the new Infested affix, Waycrest Manor suffers from many game-breaking bugs that end in the entire instance being pulled due to doors not properly working as intended.
A "stat squish" and "item squish" was implemented to lower the numbers used in the game, e.g. a legendary item previously with a level of 1000 reduced to 265. Unique class-specific buffs are added back, i.e. mages' Arcane Brilliance and priests' Mark of Fortitude. Titanforging—a random event that raises the initial item level of an item gained via drops or rewards—is still in the game; however, if the item is one of those affected by the Heart of Azeroth, then that item cannot be titanforged.
Unfortunately, the BfA prepatch took away more than usual--having an entire expansion balanced around an ultra-powerful weapon that abruptly turned into a dead stat stick made the end of Legion particularly depressing--and offered very little in return. The patch didn't flop because of bugs; it failed because it's boring, unrewarding, limited, unambitious, and actively feels like it's punishing players at a time they should be celebrating.
But compare that with BfA's lackluster prepatch. Last week, players' uber-powerful Artifact weapons, which they had spent the entire Legion expansion building up, abruptly burnt out with no in-game explanation, no storyline, no quest, no Dad jokes from Khadgar, just a line of text on the Artifact screen saying they had been sacrificed to help stop the destruction of the world--part of the ending quests for Legion.
Players’ relationships with the NPCs around them have been hit-and-miss over the years. One of the original issues with Thrall, the Horde’s original Warchief, is that players began to refer to him as “green Jesus,” because of how infinitely powerful and infallible he was. But he’s been gone since the Warlord of Draenor expansion, and with the death of Varian Wrynn and Vol’Jin at the start of Legion, the old guard hasn’t been there to guide players the same way as it used to be.
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