Dugi and Zygor both had their guides updated before Mist of Pandaria was released and both guides are kept updated with all the patches and changes to the game. Dugi is way faster with updates and has a lot more. Zygor seems to hold out and then do a big update. With new content such as guides etc, Dugi is definitely leading the way with Zygor usually many months behind. Zygor now offers the same number of guides as Dugi but it took them a long time to catch up.
Do quests and complete the story of your first chosen area before returning to your capital to scrap all of the equipment items you acquired. You should be around Level 113 by the time you complete your first area. Before selecting your second zone, head to your faction hub ship to acquire your introductory quests to the mission table and your champions. Complete this introduction and then pick up the quest to establish your first foothold in enemy territory.

It’s a good thing that the previous expansion, Legion, was the best in the game’s history because Battle for Azeroth is coasting on its success. The major class redesigns that happened then remain in effect (though some are a little worse, and some a little better), and the combination of World Quests and Mythic+ dungeons means there’s always something to do, no matter your skill level or how long you can play.

For reference, my previous best time abusing Method-0 in 7.3.5 was 32.4 hours(as show in the old thread). A difference of just over 8 hours; which isn't all that bad, all things considered. And I believe I made several errors along the way, which could be cleaned up in future runs. I believe that that gap could be significantly closed by using a monk's bonus, but I hate playing monk...so...yeah. YMMV
REALMS Aerie Peak Aman'Thul Area 52 Arthas Baelgun Barthilas Blackrock Bleeding Hollow Burning Legion Cenarius Dalaran Darkspear Earthen Ring Emerald Dream Frostmourne Garona Garrosh Hyjal Illidan Kel'Thuzad Kil'jaeden Korgath Lightbringer Mal'Ganis Moon Guard Proudmoore Ravenholdt Sargeras Saurfang Shattered Hand Stormrage Stormreaver Thrall Tichondrius Turalyon Wyrmrest Accord Zul'jin Aegwynn, Bonechewer, Daggerspine, Gurubashi, and Hakkar Agamaggan, Archimonde, Jaedenar, and The Underbog Aggramar and Fizzcrank Akama, Dragonmaw, and Mug'thol Alleria and Khadgar Alexstrasza and Terokkar Altar of Storms, Anetheron, Magtheridon, and Ysondre Alterac Mountains, Balnazzar, Gorgonnash, The Forgotten Coast, and Warsong Andorhal, Scilla, Ursin, and Zuluhed Antonidas and Uldum Anub’arak, Chromaggus, Crushridge, Garithos, Nathrezim, and Smolderthorn Anvilmar and Undermine Arathor and Drenden Argent Dawn and The Scryers Arygos and Llane Auchindoun, Cho'gall, and Laughing Skull Azgalor, Azshara, Destromath, and Thunderlord Azjol-Nerub and Khaz Modan Azuremyst and Staghelm Baelgun and Doomhammer Black Dragonflight, Gul'dan, and Skullcrusher Blackhand and Galakrond Blackwater Raiders and Shadow Council Blackwing Lair, Dethecus, Detheroc, Haomarush, Lethon, and Shadowmoon Bladefist and Kul Tiras Blade's Edge and Thunderhorn Blood Furnace, Mannoroth, and Nazjatar Bloodhoof and Duskwood Bloodscalp, Boulderfist, Dunemaul, Maiev, and Stonemaul Borean Tundra and Shadowsong Bronzebeard and Shandris Burning Blade, Lightning's Blade, and Onyxia Caelestrasz and Nagrand Cairne and Perenolde Cenarion Circle and Sisters of Elune Coilfang, Dark Iron, Dalvengyr, and Demon Soul Dawnbringer and Madoran Darrowmere and Windrunner Dath'Remar and Khaz'goroth Deathwing, Executus, Kalecgos, and Shattered Halls Dentarg and Whisperwind Detheroc and Shadowmoon Draenor and Echo Isles Dragonblight and Fenris Draka and Suramar Drak’Tharon, Firetree, Malorne, Rivendare, Spirestone, and Stormscale Drak'thul and Skywall Dreadmaul and Thaurissan Durotan and Ysera Eitrigg and Shu'halo Eldre’Thalas and Korialstrasz Elune and Gilneas Eonar and Velen Eredar, Gorefiend, Spinebreaker, and Wildhammer Exodar and Medivh Farstriders, Silver Hand, and Thorium Brotherhood Feathermoon and Scarlet Crusade Frostmane, Ner'zhul, and Tortheldrin Frostwolf and Vashj Ghostlands and Kael'thas Gnomeregan and Moonrunner Greymane and Tanaris Grizzly Hills and Lothar Gundrak and Jubei'Thos Hellscream and Zangarmarsh Hydraxis and Terenas Icecrown and Malygos Kargath and Norgannon Kilrogg and Winterhoof Kirin Tor, Sentinels, and Steamwheedle Cartel Lightninghoof, Maelstrom, and The Venture Co Malfurion and Trollbane Misha and Rexxar Mok'Nathal and Silvermoon Muradin and Nordrassil Nazgrel, Nesingwary, and Vek'nilash Quel'dorei and Sen'jin Ravencrest and Uldaman Ravenholdt and Twisting Nether Runetotem and Uther
At the end of Legion, the titan Sargeras was imprisoned, but not before he plunged his sword into the planet Azeroth. This not only devastated a massive area (much of the desert zone of Silithus is now cracked and scorched), but badly wounded the gestating titan inside. While the heroes managed to ablate the worst of the damage (at the cost of the majority of their artifact weapons' mythic power), the world is still wounded and bleeding a substance called "Azerite," which has great magical potential. The Horde Warchief, Sylvanas Windrunner, attempts to consolidate Horde power on Kalimdor and gain a monopoly on Azerite (which is primarily found at the southern end of the continent). Her campaign to do so, the War of Thorns, formed a pre-launch event for the expansion and ends with the major Night Elf holdings on the continent seized or (in the case of their capital city of Darnassus) annihilated. The Alliance makes a retaliatory strike against her home base, the Undercity, which was formerly the human capital of Lordaeron. This succeeds in driving the Horde out, but before leaving Sylvanas saturates the area with disease and toxins that render it uninhabitable. With this tit-for-tat military exchange, the Horde has almost complete control over Kalimdor, while the Alliance has near-total dominion over the Eastern Kingdoms.[4] With further conflict inevitable, Battle for Azeroth takes the two factions to the continents of Kul Tiras and Zandalar to recruit new allies in order to turn the tides of war.[4]
Two new raids coming after the initial update differ drastically in size and content, depending on which side of the war you’re on. The Battle of Dazar’alor raid sees Alliance players trying to take over a city, but if you’re part of the horde, your version will see you try to defend it. Once you’ve beaten it once, you can then play the other side. The Crucible of Storms raid, on the other hand, is smaller and only consists of two bosses.
-Warfronts- I liked the idea of warfronts because it blends elements of Warcraft III with World of Warcraft, however, it's not a PvP battleground or instance, it's PvE so given time, it's a guaranteed win so many people are starting to AFK in the warfront. Beyond that, there is only one warfront to participate in right now. Also, when preparing for a warfront, Blizzard presents you with daily quests to help "aid" the warfront, however, your daily quest turn ins have no bases on the progression of warfront. The warfront will continue to advance at the same rate no matter if you do zero quests or everyone does all the quests.
The world quests aren’t necessarily bad, but they aren’t good either. I wouldn’t mind killing five of a type of monster or fighting one particular boss a few times, but after seven or eight, it starts to wear pretty thin. But going from levels in the mid-20s can take nearly 30,000 AP, so you’ll need more than world quests if you want to get your heart up in a reasonable time.
At the same time, a stat "squish" meant that players' gear level, health and damage were drastically reduced. Monsters' stats were similarly clobbered, though predictably, some lesser-known abilities immediately started one-shotting players. (On the beta servers, a simple toy allowed players to kill each other with one blow, with amusing results; but even on live servers, those bugs were legion.)
Bags: This SHOULD be a no-brainer. The cheap-o version are Netherweave bags, but if you have the gold I recommend you get the largest bags you can afford, since it means you won't have to stop to clean them out as often. In fact, if you have an excess of gold, it's probably not even worth your time to stop and loot mobs that aren't quest objectives. This seems like a small thing, but over the course of 100+ levels, all those clicks to loot add up.
I would totally recommend using Zygor's if you are leveling alts or don't care about the quests you're doing, because it offers a huge leveling advantage in terms of streamlining what you do. Just let the arrow tell you what to do and you never have to think about where you're going or what you're doing. When I use this addon (and the leveling guides) I definitely understand why he charges for it.
The Heart of Azeroth is an artifact given to the player character from the world soul via Magni Bronzebeard. It is a necklace that can use the power of Azerite, the lifeblood of the embryonic titan Azeroth (See Plot, below). Azerite is similar in function to Legion's artifact power, in that it is gathered normally from playing the game and is used to upgrade an artifact; likewise, the Heart is similar in function to Legion's artifact weapons by having the capacity to be constantly upgraded. Unlike artifact weapons, however, the Heart is shared with all of the player's specializations and can empower all eligible pieces worn simultaneously.
 Mag'har orc - "For untold generations, the orc clans of Draenor battled one another in endless war. But when Gul'dan offered them the blood of his demonic masters, the disparate tribes of Mag'har—the orcish word for "uncorrupted"—refused the dark bargain and banded together to drive out the Burning Legion. United under the leadership of Grommash Hellscream, the Mag'har pledged to one day repay Azeroth's heroes for aiding their cause. As war against the Alliance intensifies, the Horde must call upon the might of the Mag'har to seize victory."
Potions serve more utilitarian purposes, and it's up to you to decide whether to make use of them. The most common is the Swiftness Potion, which can provide you a handy boost in speed while going after annoying quest objectives indoors. These are generally MASSIVELY overpriced, because people know how useful they are. I opted not to spend the gold since Warriors are already fairly mobile, but slower classes may benefit greatly from these.

-PvP- Completely broken for some classes and I mean broken going from both sides of the spectrum, from classes destroying everyone, to classes that can't even kill another player. It's fairly common for a weak class to lose to a powerful class even if the weak class outgears them by 50+ ilvls. That's how broken PvP is and Blizzard doesn't seem to know what to do to fix it other than do blanket damage nerfs/buffs as those are the only changes we've seen.
Today, I finally found out what the real problem was. I have always had the "Enable Zone Map" feature off, but noticed that I had "Enable Auto Zoom" still enabled. I assumed if you turned the map off, the auto zoom would just automatically not do anything. Turns out, every time I moved, the auto zoom was still collecting information and 'zooming' a map that didn't exist. I've turned it off now and my game is perfect - not a single slowdown. The difference is dramatic.
You can earn a decent amount of XP by doing Herbalism or mining. Any zone works but I prefer Sholazar Basin as a lot of the mobs are not aggressive and the mobs are spread out so you will find a lot of herbs and ore that you don’t have to fight for. It is possible to make about a level every hour by doing this, or a level every 30-40 minutes with rest XP.
As for the classes themselves, they almost all play like slower and slightly less interesting versions of their Legion counterparts. This is thanks in large part to the loss of one ability from each class that came along with Legion’s own AP dumping system: the artifact weapon, which added a unique ability to every spec in the game. The loss of these abilities left most classes feeling frustrating and incomplete, and though Azerite gear was supposed to be the replacement, it missed the mark completely. There will always be one Azerite trait that reigns supreme for each spec, meaning that the frustration of that particular loop will be unavoidable as long as the system is in the game.
Elixirs serve the same purpose as Flasks, but the buff expires if you die. You'll only use these between 1-70, generally speaking, until you can start buying Flasks which persist through death. Try not to die, and carry extras just in case. If you can't find an Elixir with the stat you want, look under scrolls, since they count as battle or guardian buffs as well.
That’s because armor of higher level has higher Azerite power requirements than lower level armor. That means a shiny new piece of Epic gear will have better stats but, unless you’ve been diligent about your Azerite power grind, won’t have as many traits unlocked. You lose options as you earn better gear. Eventually, you’ll grind out enough Azerite to earn those traits back, but you’re left with limited customization until then.
×