Azeroth paid a terrible price to end the apocalyptic march of the Legion’s crusade—but even as the world’s wounds are tended, it is the shattered trust between the Alliance and Horde that may prove hardest to mend. As this age-old conflict reignites, gather your allies and champion your faction’s cause—for Azeroth’s future will be forged in the fires of war.
If you need the abridged version, because you’d rather spend an hour in a game than hearing someone talk about a game, you can also check out the excellent “New & Returning Player Guides” series from YouTuber (and World of Warcraft expert) Bellular. And you probably even skip the bits about ”how to purchase” or “how to install” the game, saving you even more time for new World of Warcraft adventures:
If we consider a group of players, the squad has three main roles: “tank”, fighter and healer. Warrior can be a great “tank”, in other words, the defender. “Tanks” are very hardy and can absorb a large amount of damage, but their main task – divertenemy’s attention from more vulnerable members of the group. Magicians, mentioned above – are the characters that cause a lot of damage. Priests, whose vocation is to heal the suffering, cannot inflict significant damage, compared to other classes, but their role is difficult to overestimate, because they help colleagues to survive, using their knowledge of healing.
A central problem of long-running MMOs like WoW is that the player's numbers have to continuously get bigger and bigger in order for the player to feel more powerful. When the original game released back in 2004, player health pools topped out in the thousands of hit points. Today, everyone is running around with absolutely massive numbers on their stat sheets, many of which have climbed into the millions. Players can deal out an equally massive amount of damage and it's gotten to the point where there are so many large numbers flashing across the screen during combat that it can be hard to keep track of exactly how well you are performing.
Warmode is one of the real stand-out features of Battle for Azeroth, even if it is a somewhat controversial one. Warmode tries to revolutionize world PvP like the game has never seen. By switching on Warmode, you enter a new version of your server with only other people looking to fight out in the world. The result is a more volatile world where fights can break out at any time, and groups from to go fight the opposing faction.
Was doing it at 52 on my lightforged paladin and it was easily the slowest zone out of the ones I'd done. Granted, I didn't have War Mode on so I didn't have any PVP talents, but it felt like about 40% of my time was spent waiting around for respawns or wandering around looking for mobs to kill to get a quest item that had like a 5% drop rate. Maybe I just got unlucky but I definitely won't be going to that zone again for future heritage armor runs.
Each of those modes existed long before this latest expansion; raiding is a basic concept in MMOs, and Mythic+ was added in World of Warcraft’s last expansion. The problems with Battle for Azeroth’s endgame come from the systems it adds, which most often artificially gate progress where most of the fun can be found. If raids and Mythic+ are the carrot, we’re about to talk about the stick. 

I do not recommend going for TBC, although I remember Hellfire peninsula to be decent, everything else is rather slow. Instead go for WotLK, Borean Thundra gets you levelled very fast, and then you can head straight for Icecrown at 67, which is also insanely fast, although admittedly has a few elite quests. You can go to Sholazar Basin alternatively. 2 zones should get you 60-80 no problem. 
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