Both guides have a different look. Many players choose the Zygor guide because of the way it looks, with it’s modern, clean appearance. Zygor has improved it, so its easier to navigate. Dugi Guides interface blends into the game more, as it looks more like something you would find within World of Warcraft. It has icons down the right hand side for selecting your guides and is really easy to navigate.
If you’ve seen or heard people getting excited for World of Warcraft because it’s “getting back to its roots,” thanks to a renewed focus on the shared hatred between the game’s two major factions—Horde and Alliance—in its new Battle for Azeroth expansion, maybe you’re tempted to sign up and give the game a whirl. Or, if you haven’t played in years, perhaps you’re curious to see what’s changed.
I just decided that I would simply finish leveling my hunter the hard way, but when i can get heirlooms ill make a warrior and follow your guide to 80. I definitly want an 80 warrior for cataclysm... seeing as worgen warrior is going to be a crazy tank! By the way, is using heirlooms with your guides ok? And what class should I be for a tank? I will obviously be switching to worgen anyway but i would prefer best tanking until then. Thanks Jame!
Battle for Azeroth’s War Mode puts you into PvP mode and grants you 10 percent extra experience. But since the two factions will mostly level in separate zones entirely, you should almost definitely have this on when you’re leveling. That said, if you start getting killed by random PvP players consistently, stop using it. Although 10 percent is nice, it’s not worth dying every few minutes for.

A central problem of long-running MMOs like WoW is that the player's numbers have to continuously get bigger and bigger in order for the player to feel more powerful. When the original game released back in 2004, player health pools topped out in the thousands of hit points. Today, everyone is running around with absolutely massive numbers on their stat sheets, many of which have climbed into the millions. Players can deal out an equally massive amount of damage and it's gotten to the point where there are so many large numbers flashing across the screen during combat that it can be hard to keep track of exactly how well you are performing.
Each of those modes existed long before this latest expansion; raiding is a basic concept in MMOs, and Mythic+ was added in World of Warcraft’s last expansion. The problems with Battle for Azeroth’s endgame come from the systems it adds, which most often artificially gate progress where most of the fun can be found. If raids and Mythic+ are the carrot, we’re about to talk about the stick.
Unfortunately, the BfA prepatch took away more than usual--having an entire expansion balanced around an ultra-powerful weapon that abruptly turned into a dead stat stick made the end of Legion particularly depressing--and offered very little in return. The patch didn't flop because of bugs; it failed because it's boring, unrewarding, limited, unambitious, and actively feels like it's punishing players at a time they should be celebrating.
Also get the Heirloom Mount. Being able to have basic riding speed from the beginning will save you a lot of time if you're starting from level 1. Allied races start at 20, so this is a non-issue for them. It's important to note that Pandaren can not use this mount until they finish their starting zone and pick a faction. Being Horde or Alliance is a requirement of the mount.
Anyway both got to 110 at around 50h played. I messed up with my Pal by going to Legion once I hit 100 instead of finishing treasures and bonuses in WoD. All in all, if I picked the best zones and was only trying to level as fast as I could, I would probably could have done it in roughly 40h. Note that it would have a been A LOT faster with a Monk as both Ret and Rogues don't really have a decent AoE until 40+ (45 for Ret and 63 for Rogue I believe). The daily also helps a lot. I know that leveling my Monk before the pre-patch was insanely fast. Might be slower with the changes to FoF, however.
In World of Warcraft, each character has a unique set of skills and abilities that define their role. For example, magicians –are powerful spell casters, who use supernatural forces to attack the enemy from a distance, but in the melee – are extremely vulnerable. These features determine magicians’ strategy: to keep their distance, do the most damage and hope to kill monsters before they get to them.
As for the classes themselves, they almost all play like slower and slightly less interesting versions of their Legion counterparts. This is thanks in large part to the loss of one ability from each class that came along with Legion’s own AP dumping system: the artifact weapon, which added a unique ability to every spec in the game. The loss of these abilities left most classes feeling frustrating and incomplete, and though Azerite gear was supposed to be the replacement, it missed the mark completely. There will always be one Azerite trait that reigns supreme for each spec, meaning that the frustration of that particular loop will be unavoidable as long as the system is in the game.

Players’ relationships with the NPCs around them have been hit-and-miss over the years. One of the original issues with Thrall, the Horde’s original Warchief, is that players began to refer to him as “green Jesus,” because of how infinitely powerful and infallible he was. But he’s been gone since the Warlord of Draenor expansion, and with the death of Varian Wrynn and Vol’Jin at the start of Legion, the old guard hasn’t been there to guide players the same way as it used to be.
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