We’ve spent a lot of space giving advice for those with less experience in the nuances of World of Warcraft. If you’re a player who generally knows how to get around the game—or did at one point—you’re probably still going to feel a little stuck if it’s been a decent amount of time since you last played. For example, why does your favorite weapon no longer work the way it used to? What’s the latest currency you have to know about? Should you ever waste time hanging out in your Garrison again?
If you want to spend as little time on your alt as possible - just do Legion Invasions. You can use sites like (https://wow.gameinfo.io/invasions) to track when the next invasion will be. Log in, fly to the closest world quest, and once there - right-click on the quest's name in your quest log and "Find Group". Sign up for some group, or if there's none - just start your own immediately, and people will come to you. It is 10 times faster to do invasion quests in a group. Once that particular quest is complete - leave the group, and fly to the next one, where you should find another group. Don't expect the group from one world quest to follow you to the next. Then you simply log out until next invasion. You can do 1-2 invasions a day, and each invasion will give you about a level or 1.5 of experience, if you have full heirloom gear. Each invasion will take about 20 minutes.
I'm very, very interested in a guide that takes into the following: 1) Dungeon finder; and 2) Heirloom items. I've never helped with a guide before, but would be open to help in collaborating on the project. With the leveling guides I've used (primarily this one) I, too, find that I level at a rate that throws the pace of the guide way off (not its fault at all, I can't say enough good stuff about the guide) to the point that I get frustrated and just queue up for dungeons.
At 96 the standard wisdom is to immediately drop what you're doing and proceed to Spires of Arak and do the quests to unlock the Inn, granting a further 20% experience bonus while in that zone. You'll want to do that eventually anyway, but I'm not sure it outweighs the quest experience from Gorgrond. However, if you decided to go to Spires immediately at 96, restrict yourself only to bonus objectives and again leave Treasures until you're 100+. Make certain that when you being the quests to unlock the inn, you speak with the quest NPC to also learn Archaeology, since it's required to collect several of the treasures in Spires.
Players who were around during Mists of Pandaria might recall a dungeon mode called Scenarios, which involved teams of three players instead of the traditional five. Island Expeditions bring a similar feel, with groups being tasked with plundering treasure off various islands. Your team faces off against other players or AI-controlled characters from the opposing faction and whoever can collect the most treasure, or "Azerite," wins.
The downside is that War Mode will make you vulnerable to other players, which means you might be killed more often. Whether it’s worthwhile will depend on the zones you’re visiting and how active the other faction is on your server cluster. Heavily populated realms usually mean more players on both sides, and more conflict, but on quieter realms, you may rarely run across an enemy.
Tiragarde Sound and Stormsong Valley are both fairly similar zones, but Stormsong is a little longer, meaning that you might not even have to finish it to hit 120. Tiragarde also comes with a bit of a warning. There are plenty of side quests to do in the zone after you finish the story quests. Don’t do them. It’s not worth the time or the experience you’ll get.

That’s because armor of higher level has higher Azerite power requirements than lower level armor. That means a shiny new piece of Epic gear will have better stats but, unless you’ve been diligent about your Azerite power grind, won’t have as many traits unlocked. You lose options as you earn better gear. Eventually, you’ll grind out enough Azerite to earn those traits back, but you’re left with limited customization until then.

Incursions are a new world content activity that are unlocked when one character has unlocked World Quests. This feature is unlocked account-wide meaning that all characters on that account can access Incursions even without being Level 120. This provides for a lucrative experience acquisition method that is available in a similar pattern to what Legion Invasions offered with nearly an entire level earned by completing an Incursion series which involves four World Quests and one mini-scenario at the end. These also grant item level 370 weapons and Azerite armor, so they should be done any time they are up. Incursions follow a similar schedule to Invasions and are available for 20 hours once they are initiated.
Each of those modes existed long before this latest expansion; raiding is a basic concept in MMOs, and Mythic+ was added in World of Warcraft’s last expansion. The problems with Battle for Azeroth’s endgame come from the systems it adds, which most often artificially gate progress where most of the fun can be found. If raids and Mythic+ are the carrot, we’re about to talk about the stick.
But the system offers a painful and mindless grind. At worst, it feels like a cheap and artificial wall blocking you from playing your character to its full potential. Levels of your heart come fast at first, but the costs become prohibitive when you get up into level 20 or so. This wouldn’t be an issue if the most powerful Azerite gear didn’t require reaching level 22 to unlock even 75 percent of their full damage, leaving players left out of features from gear they’ve already collected. This means more grinding.
New to Patch 8.1 is a new leveling flask called the Draught of Ten Lands which increases all primary and secondary stats by 20 and experience gained by 10%. This effect lasts for one hour and persists through death, similar to other battle flasks. This item can be purchased using a new Patch 8.1 currency called 7th Legion Service Medal or Honorbound Service Medal which can be earned doing the new incursions and Warfront activities. Simple earn these medals on your main character, purchase the flasks, and send them to your other characters. The cost is 10 of the medals.
The expansion brings a major change to the PvP ruleset on each realm. Every realm by default only allows players to attack NPCs in the open world; players who wish to engage in world PvP now have a setting called "War Mode" that can only be toggled on or off in their faction's capital city (i.e. Stormwind for the Alliance and Orgrimmar for the Horde). While in War Mode, players have access to new talents and abilities, as well as a slightly accelerated rate of XP gain.[10] Characters with War Mode activated are only able to see other players with War Mode, unless in their own capital cities.
Bags: This SHOULD be a no-brainer. The cheap-o version are Netherweave bags, but if you have the gold I recommend you get the largest bags you can afford, since it means you won't have to stop to clean them out as often. In fact, if you have an excess of gold, it's probably not even worth your time to stop and loot mobs that aren't quest objectives. This seems like a small thing, but over the course of 100+ levels, all those clicks to loot add up.
Special note: At 110 it's almost certainly worthwhile to go and immediately get your Heart of Azeroth and first piece of Azerite gear from the BfA opening quest. It doesn't take long and provides pretty high power levels. I'd then return to Legion quests until 111 or even 112, since the power of these items will increase your kill speed significantly over the scaled enemies of BfA content.

Despite all of these problems and this laundry list of glaring systematic issues, the crowning achievement of Battle for Azeroth’s endgame is that it still remains enjoyable all due to those two pillars of raiding and dungeons. That won’t last forever. As the expansion goes on, and the grind necessary to progress becomes even more demanding and the time spent in content that simply isn’t fun increases, it will be harder and harder for raiding and Mythic+ to carry the expansion along.
The tail end of Legion saw the introduction of Allied Races, which introduced two new races for each side to play as. Battle for Azeroth introduces more, with Dark Iron Dwarves and brown-skinned Orcs included in the upcoming choices. Blizzard hasn't confirmed much about what other kinds of races might show up, but there's plenty of datamined info out there for those who want to take a look. Allied Races start at level 20 after a short scenario and players can earn a special set of cosmetic armor if they level the character all the way to 1110 without buying a level boost.

This week, the story began: A short series of quests begin to pit Alliance and Horde against each other, and the skirmishes over territory that will soon be destroyed began. Realistically, that meant players had about 20-30 minutes of questing, at which point (without any in-game announcement or breadcrumbs) four world quests opened up in an existing contested zone.
I have tried it a few times. It's good if you're new to the game. Otherwise not so much. I found I leveled slower by using it, as it's suggesting to take the longest possible route usually. Basically following roads everytime, when you could take an easy shortcut. Especially if the shortcut involves a bit of fall damage, it's out of question. The "go here" spots don't also update if you take a shortcut, and then the waypoint arrow points to wrong direction. But perhaps it has been updated since then.
I've used WoW-Pro for years and in WoD, Legion and now BfA it's been awesome for just going on auto-pilot and working your way through a zone. It has 3 levels of depth you can set, so you can set it to just do 1) the main story, main points of interest and rare mobs and treasure that aren't far off the beaten path; 2) every quest with a more thorough dive into the side stuff; 3) absolutely everything.
Battle for Azeroth’s War Mode puts you into PvP mode and grants you 10 percent extra experience. But since the two factions will mostly level in separate zones entirely, you should almost definitely have this on when you’re leveling. That said, if you start getting killed by random PvP players consistently, stop using it. Although 10 percent is nice, it’s not worth dying every few minutes for.
Havoc in Battle for Azeroth has gone through somewhat of a maturing process, trying to focus more on the talent tree and allowing for more diverse options in gameplay approaches, alongside tightening up some of the more loose aspects of the original implementation. It still remains a predominantly builder spender style rotation and is largely Global Cooldown locked. The core hook is making the most of your Fury pool and reacting to unpredictable gains, ensuring you use high burst cooldowns and windows to push yourself even further. On top of that, it comes with a variety of mobility and defense tools, creating a versatile toolkit with some unique abilities that can be used in a variety of ways.
The cloak is nice because you only need one of these instead of the previous cloak versions since the primary stat changes depending on the class it is used on. The on use trinkets for versatility, haste, or critical strike could be very strong if used together by numerous party members with the same trinket. Finally, the threat reducing trinket could be useful for solo levelers in dungeons with newer, non-heirloom geared tanks in order to not pull threat on some larger packs of enemies.
I just decided that I would simply finish leveling my hunter the hard way, but when i can get heirlooms ill make a warrior and follow your guide to 80. I definitly want an 80 warrior for cataclysm... seeing as worgen warrior is going to be a crazy tank! By the way, is using heirlooms with your guides ok? And what class should I be for a tank? I will obviously be switching to worgen anyway but i would prefer best tanking until then. Thanks Jame!
But one major question that keeps popping up as players reach the level cap is, "what do I do when I hit Level 120?". On the surface, it would seem pretty simple that your next steps would be gearing up to raid. However, BfA doesn’t exactly make it clear how to go about doing that, and there are more options for future raiders and dungeoneers than ever before when it comes to endgame content.
As a hero of the mighty Alliance, journey to the seafaring kingdom of Kul Tiras, home of Jaina Proudmoore. Untangle a web of betrayal and dark magic as you encounter power-hungry pirates, witches wielding death magic, mystical sea priests, and more. Explore the stony peaks of Tiragarde Sound, trek across Drustvar’s high plains and red forests, and navigate the intricate inland canals of Stormsong Valley as you convince this fractured kingdom to join your cause.
While leveling, try to make use of the new Battle of Azeroth experience gem,  Insightful Rubellite, which gives you +5% experience. Equipping one of these requires a socket in your gear, so try to hold on to a piece of Legion gear with a socket or acquire one of the Legion Legendary rings since every class has one. Each of the rings includes a socket. You can acquire one of these rings rather easily by doing World Quests in Legion zones and acquiring 1,000  Wakening Essences that can be used to purchase a legendary ring in the Legion version of Dalaran.

This week, the story began: A short series of quests begin to pit Alliance and Horde against each other, and the skirmishes over territory that will soon be destroyed began. Realistically, that meant players had about 20-30 minutes of questing, at which point (without any in-game announcement or breadcrumbs) four world quests opened up in an existing contested zone.

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