For Alliance it's Lok'Modan, Redridge, Darkshore, Felwood, Stranglethorn (both parts), Plaguelands. Somewhere between 3 - 3.5 of these get you to 60 in like a 16 hours /played, if you queue for dungeons at the same time. I recommend dropping everything at 45 and going to Darkshore-Felwood if you didn't do them yet - they are literally the fastest levelling zones in the game right now, maybe only trumped by Silverpine.
The game guide to the World of Warcraft Battle for Azeroth is a handy set of practical advice and guidelines that will help you in getting answers to the most important questions about the new expansion. Battle for Azeroth is the latest expansion set to the much-loved MMO game. Since its launch the game has collected great reviews and everything indicates that Blizzard has delivered another exquisite in-game content for months to come.
If you’re a returning player, consider paying for a month’s worth of playing time—a mere $15—and using the game’s newer Class Trials to see if you still have that spark for higher-level play. While you can also go the “Starter Edition” route for a free, limited romp through Azeroth, you might need a little more than the newbie zones to help you decide whether you want to play through the game’s latest expansion. 

If you’re a returning player, consider paying for a month’s worth of playing time—a mere $15—and using the game’s newer Class Trials to see if you still have that spark for higher-level play. While you can also go the “Starter Edition” route for a free, limited romp through Azeroth, you might need a little more than the newbie zones to help you decide whether you want to play through the game’s latest expansion.

-Azerite Gear- This has been the worst experience for many players as it was advertised as offering the player many options for customizing their character but all players do is Google "Icy veins (Spec/Class) azerite ranks" and select the best one. This is expected and really only gives players the illusion of choice as they're always going to pick the best one. This could have been done far better by not offering necessarily just damage increases in traits but offering some of the Legion Legendary item effects in Azerite slots. You know, certain Azerite traits would be better for PvP, some for raiding, some for 5 mans, some for soloing old content, etc. The other problem with Azerite gear is that it's locked based on you grinding an endless amount of Azerite for your neck piece (basically the stuff that increases the level of your neck piece). So when you get an item that should be an upgrade, it really isn't because you don't have all the traits unlocked. This complaint about how horrible this system is could go on forever, but I'll just leave it at that, horrible.


Bags: This SHOULD be a no-brainer. The cheap-o version are Netherweave bags, but if you have the gold I recommend you get the largest bags you can afford, since it means you won't have to stop to clean them out as often. In fact, if you have an excess of gold, it's probably not even worth your time to stop and loot mobs that aren't quest objectives. This seems like a small thing, but over the course of 100+ levels, all those clicks to loot add up.
In World of Warcraft, each character has a unique set of skills and abilities that define their role. For example, magicians –are powerful spell casters, who use supernatural forces to attack the enemy from a distance, but in the melee – are extremely vulnerable. These features determine magicians’ strategy: to keep their distance, do the most damage and hope to kill monsters before they get to them.

What’s worse, it’s rarely satisfying when you do make it to a new milestone in your grind to unlock the gear you need. Legion had legendary items that changed the way an ability functioned, which would also completely change the way classes played; the Azerite traits in the Battle for Azeroth are rarely as interesting. Instead, they are simply passive bonuses that, in most cases, help you do more damage without any extra effort on your part. While some classes are lucky enough to have traits that change their gameplay slightly, Blizzard has so far seemed to favor nerfing those traits out of viability for most specs.

The raid is made up of eight bosses that each have interesting and unique mechanics. Some bosses might put extra pressure on the DPS players to kill an add before it can heal the boss, while others might require players to move around the environment in a specific pattern or order, all the while still doing as much damage to the boss as possible or keeping the group alive through healing. While past raids often repeated mechanics or had one or two boring fights that didn’t ask much of the players, each encounter in Uldir feels unique and challenging. It’s been a long time since we had a raid where each fight was as much fun to do over and over again as the fights in Uldir.
These guides are completely automated and work in-game, so you can see step-by-step instructions as you play. The guides automatically move to a new step as you complete the quests. You are told where to go i.e. the questgivers for accepting and turning in quests along with where and how to complete the quests. Zygor has more steps and details, which would be more suited to beginners. Dugi condenses the info into fewer steps, but still has all the necessary questing info.
The raid is made up of eight bosses that each have interesting and unique mechanics. Some bosses might put extra pressure on the DPS players to kill an add before it can heal the boss, while others might require players to move around the environment in a specific pattern or order, all the while still doing as much damage to the boss as possible or keeping the group alive through healing. While past raids often repeated mechanics or had one or two boring fights that didn’t ask much of the players, each encounter in Uldir feels unique and challenging. It’s been a long time since we had a raid where each fight was as much fun to do over and over again as the fights in Uldir.
Mythic+ has some similarity to raiding, but it’s designed for just five players, instead of the 10-to-30 that can make up a raid. This mode tasks players with clearing the game’s dungeons, but with specific changes that make them harder, scaling up until it’s impossible for groups to finish. Players receive a keystone in their inventory that assigns them their dungeon, one of the game’s 10, and gives the dungeon a level. This determines how difficult enemies are and what effects might make them harder. If the group completes the keystone in time, they get a new, higher-level stone; if they, don’t they get a lower-level stone.
Groups are constantly forming in the group finder to go battle the enemy faction. If you’re more of a lone wolf, you can still stalk around the world looking for enemy players. You’re bound to find some. World quests with Warmode on also spark some seriously interesting interactions, especially ones for neutral factions like the Champions of Azeroth.
Dugi’s leveling guide is the leveling addon I’ve always used to level as fast as possible. It will show you where to go and what to do in-game, speeding up the leveling process. This is optional though, as the game already does a pretty good job at showing you where to go at all times. The addon does, however, come with a couple of other nice features and perks.
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