The reason is because higher rank recipes stay orange longer, so you get guaranteed skill points longer. The rank 2 of this recipe turns yellow at 135, while the rank 3 is orange up to 145. The rank 3 also cost fewer materials, so you will save a lot of materials by getting the rank 3. You could actually level to 150 with the rank 2 recipe, but it will be green for the last 8 points, so you will have to spend a lot of extra materials, and there is no reason to rush 150, so I recommend to wait until you get the rank 3.
If you love running old content for transmog items, you'll love the new legacy loot system. Whenever a player enters a dungeon or raid where they are 10 or more levels above the content, the dungeon or raid bosses drop an amount of loot equivalent to what would have dropped for a full group when the content was current. That means players could earn loot for five people in dungeons and loot for 20 people after soloing a raid. The legacy loot system also drops other gear types, like cloth dropping for a plate wearer. It's now much easier to get the transmog gear you want, and you can also collect gear for your alts on the same run.
Sometimes that requires players to earn gear to give them greater powers that they haven’t yet unlocked. That sense of progression is at the center of what makes World of Warcraft great and so successful over the last 14 years. There should always be a balance between gaining gear and strength through lower-level content and taking on the hardest challenges the game has to offer. With Battle for Azeroth, Blizzard has missed the mark. Getting to elite status just requires grinding content that isn’t fun, instead of players demonstrating their skills.
5% was admittedly an exaggeration, just felt that low. I'd say it was probably closer to the 30-40% range. It was Artifacts of the Blacksilt, spent a good 10-15 minutes killing Blacksilt Seers to get two damn idols to drop. A quest that had me killing Elder Brown Bears for bear flanks also took quite a while, though that was less due to drop rate and more due to how spread out they were.

Once again, as soon as you hit 70 - I recommend to go and learn faster flying. This speeds up your questing A LOT, and is worth the time and gold. It will cost 4500 if you go to the capitol, or 5000 if you prefer Shattrath/Dalaran, because you will not have reputation with them at that point. This price will sadly be above what a totally new character can afford, if you don't have any Main. But you should go and buy flying as soon as you have enough money.
Dugi and Zygor both had their guides updated before Mist of Pandaria was released and both guides are kept updated with all the patches and changes to the game. Dugi is way faster with updates and has a lot more. Zygor seems to hold out and then do a big update. With new content such as guides etc, Dugi is definitely leading the way with Zygor usually many months behind. Zygor now offers the same number of guides as Dugi but it took them a long time to catch up.
But one major question that keeps popping up as players reach the level cap is, "what do I do when I hit Level 120?". On the surface, it would seem pretty simple that your next steps would be gearing up to raid. However, BfA doesn’t exactly make it clear how to go about doing that, and there are more options for future raiders and dungeoneers than ever before when it comes to endgame content.
The zone you start in isn't under your control, in as much as it's pre-selected for you based on your race. But for leveling purposes we want to make scaling work for us as much as possible. That means sticking to the lower level zones. Even though scaling will increase the level of the quests and mobs in those zones, the layout and design of them is built for a player with no mount. So you'll blaze through them and gain more exp/hour than higher level zones which assume you DO have a mount.
 Mag'har orc - "For untold generations, the orc clans of Draenor battled one another in endless war. But when Gul'dan offered them the blood of his demonic masters, the disparate tribes of Mag'har—the orcish word for "uncorrupted"—refused the dark bargain and banded together to drive out the Burning Legion. United under the leadership of Grommash Hellscream, the Mag'har pledged to one day repay Azeroth's heroes for aiding their cause. As war against the Alliance intensifies, the Horde must call upon the might of the Mag'har to seize victory."
While it’s clear that Blizzard is eager not to spoil the future of Battle for Azeroth, it seems pretty unlikely that players who want to be pure evil will ever get their day to shine in World of Warcraft. Despite the decision being added into the game, the good guys will likely win and the threats to Azeroth will continue to roll on by, getting knocked out by players one at a time.

Enchants. I honestly wasn't 100% certain which enchants were best, since scaling has screwed up a lot of things. IMO, just pick the enchant for each armor slot that has the highest bonus without level restrictions. The exception is that you'll definitely want Mark of the Hidden Satyr for your neck piece, and probably Elemental Force for your weapon. Both of these proc consistently and strongly across all levels.
If you love running old content for transmog items, you'll love the new legacy loot system. Whenever a player enters a dungeon or raid where they are 10 or more levels above the content, the dungeon or raid bosses drop an amount of loot equivalent to what would have dropped for a full group when the content was current. That means players could earn loot for five people in dungeons and loot for 20 people after soloing a raid. The legacy loot system also drops other gear types, like cloth dropping for a plate wearer. It's now much easier to get the transmog gear you want, and you can also collect gear for your alts on the same run.
Still, it’s terrible to see the new expansion fail so spectacularly at iterating on Legion’s success. It’s hard to believe the two expansions came from the same company. Legion made you feel powerful and unique. Battle for Azeroth grinds at you by taking away as much as it gives. Sure, you can have a shiny toy. Sometimes. If you don’t get too carried away.
World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth is the seventh expansion for World of Warcraft revealed at BlizzCon 2017 and announced for release on August 14, 2018.[1] The Alliance, led by King Anduin and Genn Greymane, attacked Lordaeron, Warchief Sylvanas' base at Undercity, in response to the Horde burning down Teldrassil. The factions are at war. Between the Alliance-controlled Eastern Kingdoms and the Horde-controlled Kalimdor is the Great Sea. It is in this Sea that a majority of the expansion will take place.
I have tried it a few times. It's good if you're new to the game. Otherwise not so much. I found I leveled slower by using it, as it's suggesting to take the longest possible route usually. Basically following roads everytime, when you could take an easy shortcut. Especially if the shortcut involves a bit of fall damage, it's out of question. The "go here" spots don't also update if you take a shortcut, and then the waypoint arrow points to wrong direction. But perhaps it has been updated since then.
Incursions are a new world content activity that are unlocked when one character has unlocked World Quests. This feature is unlocked account-wide meaning that all characters on that account can access Incursions even without being Level 120. This provides for a lucrative experience acquisition method that is available in a similar pattern to what Legion Invasions offered with nearly an entire level earned by completing an Incursion series which involves four World Quests and one mini-scenario at the end. These also grant item level 370 weapons and Azerite armor, so they should be done any time they are up. Incursions follow a similar schedule to Invasions and are available for 20 hours once they are initiated.
Even though the guide was developed with a hunter, the guide can be followed by any class.  Except you have to do your class's quests which aren't a whole lot.  I do have full intention to make my guide friendly with all classes in the future by listing all of their steps as well.  There will be a toggle that allows you to show which class's steps you want to see in the guide.  But this is coming later.
Tiragarde Sound and Stormsong Valley are both fairly similar zones, but Stormsong is a little longer, meaning that you might not even have to finish it to hit 120. Tiragarde also comes with a bit of a warning. There are plenty of side quests to do in the zone after you finish the story quests. Don’t do them. It’s not worth the time or the experience you’ll get.
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