World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth is the seventh expansion for World of Warcraft revealed at BlizzCon 2017 and announced for release on August 14, 2018.[1] The Alliance, led by King Anduin and Genn Greymane, attacked Lordaeron, Warchief Sylvanas' base at Undercity, in response to the Horde burning down Teldrassil. The factions are at war. Between the Alliance-controlled Eastern Kingdoms and the Horde-controlled Kalimdor is the Great Sea. It is in this Sea that a majority of the expansion will take place.
Battle for Azeroth’s War Mode puts you into PvP mode and grants you 10 percent extra experience. But since the two factions will mostly level in separate zones entirely, you should almost definitely have this on when you’re leveling. That said, if you start getting killed by random PvP players consistently, stop using it. Although 10 percent is nice, it’s not worth dying every few minutes for.
Dugi and Zygor both had their guides updated before Mist of Pandaria was released and both guides are kept updated with all the patches and changes to the game. Dugi is way faster with updates and has a lot more. Zygor seems to hold out and then do a big update. With new content such as guides etc, Dugi is definitely leading the way with Zygor usually many months behind. Zygor now offers the same number of guides as Dugi but it took them a long time to catch up.
Mythic+ has some similarity to raiding, but it’s designed for just five players, instead of the 10-to-30 that can make up a raid. This mode tasks players with clearing the game’s dungeons, but with specific changes that make them harder, scaling up until it’s impossible for groups to finish. Players receive a keystone in their inventory that assigns them their dungeon, one of the game’s 10, and gives the dungeon a level. This determines how difficult enemies are and what effects might make them harder. If the group completes the keystone in time, they get a new, higher-level stone; if they, don’t they get a lower-level stone.
The WF/TF system complicates gearing a bit, as you could get an Uncommon quest reward that forges to Epic quality (not a myth - it happened to me on the first night of release). This means that the old ‘Best in Slot' system is, to all intents and purposes, useless, and you should generally opt for whatever item you have that is the highest level - especially as tier gear no longer exists.
Mythic+ has some similarity to raiding, but it’s designed for just five players, instead of the 10-to-30 that can make up a raid. This mode tasks players with clearing the game’s dungeons, but with specific changes that make them harder, scaling up until it’s impossible for groups to finish. Players receive a keystone in their inventory that assigns them their dungeon, one of the game’s 10, and gives the dungeon a level. This determines how difficult enemies are and what effects might make them harder. If the group completes the keystone in time, they get a new, higher-level stone; if they, don’t they get a lower-level stone.
You can also kick up your feet and watch your way through World of Warcraft’s story via Blizzard’s incredible cinematics—one of the company’s cornerstones. Sure, you’ll be spoiling yourself for parts of the game you have yet to uncover, and you might not know the importance of the various characters you’re watching, but you’ll at least get a pretty good sense of how World of Warcraft operates. Also, did we mention that Blizzard’s cinematics are gorgeous? We’d rather watch these than the Warcraft movie, that’s for sure.
Players’ relationships with the NPCs around them have been hit-and-miss over the years. One of the original issues with Thrall, the Horde’s original Warchief, is that players began to refer to him as “green Jesus,” because of how infinitely powerful and infallible he was. But he’s been gone since the Warlord of Draenor expansion, and with the death of Varian Wrynn and Vol’Jin at the start of Legion, the old guard hasn’t been there to guide players the same way as it used to be.
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