For Alliance it's Lok'Modan, Redridge, Darkshore, Felwood, Stranglethorn (both parts), Plaguelands. Somewhere between 3 - 3.5 of these get you to 60 in like a 16 hours /played, if you queue for dungeons at the same time. I recommend dropping everything at 45 and going to Darkshore-Felwood if you didn't do them yet - they are literally the fastest levelling zones in the game right now, maybe only trumped by Silverpine.
REDISCOVER AZEROTH AS NEW ALLIED RACES – Take a new form for your adventures as new playable Allied Races. Embark on a quest to earn the favor of the Lightforged draenei, Highmountain tauren, Nightborne, Void elves, Dark Iron dwarves, and Zandalari trolls to unlock each race and add their strength to your faction. Create a new character and complete the full leveling experience to earn a distinctive Heritage Armor set.
Take breaks. Unless you're straight up no-lifing it over a weekend or something, this leveling process is going to take ~40 hours. But any time you do need to step away, log out. That tiny little bit of rested exp is insignificant...but you never know when something might come up and you'll have to leave for a longer period of time than you expected. Better to be logged out and safe(especially with War Mode on) than AFK waiting for a d/c. Plus, you'll need to stretch, eat, shower, and maybe sleep. XD
Some people have made arguments that quest blues can sometimes be more powerful than heirlooms, especially with sockets. I'm not convinced. The simple fact that you never have to even look at quest rewards will save a non-insignificant amount of time over the course of leveling. Also of consideration is the value of enchanted gear never having to be re-enchanted.
Sometimes that requires players to earn gear to give them greater powers that they haven’t yet unlocked. That sense of progression is at the center of what makes World of Warcraft great and so successful over the last 14 years. There should always be a balance between gaining gear and strength through lower-level content and taking on the hardest challenges the game has to offer. With Battle for Azeroth, Blizzard has missed the mark. Getting to elite status just requires grinding content that isn’t fun, instead of players demonstrating their skills.
Warfronts are larger, 20-man challenges that take inspiration from the Warcraft strategy games. Players are deployed on the Warfront to collect resources, destroy enemy troops, construct buildings, and eventually launch an assault to take over the enemy base. These battles take 20 to 40 minutes to complete and, unlike Island Expeditions, don’t offer a PvP mode.
For Horde, Vol’Dun the area captures the feel of Battle for Azeroth is both the hardest and continues than other areas in the game. It can get quite frustrating in this area so better to go it early when you can utilize your old gear. The next two areas are highly dependent on personal opinion – Nazmir is filled with mobs and Zaldalar is one of the easiest zones.

War Mode: War Mode can be turned on at level 30 through your talent window, and will give you 10% bonus XP. You will, however, be attackable by players of the opposing faction, but changes have been made so that all players have a fair shot in a fight and even low-level players can kill much higher level players, and at least not get ganked and one shotted. Note: As of patch 8.1, you can get an additional call to arms bonus with war mode on if your faction is underepresented.
The idea of the expansion came up after the heroes of Azeroth dealt with so much external threats like the Burning Legion. In their own words, "so when we talk about what's the biggest threat in this world, is it the titan or is it the dwarf paladin that put a hammer in that titan's head"? As such, the enemy (at least during the early parts of the scenario) will be the opposite faction, a "vast army of world-destroying forces".[4]
Most of the time you spend leveling will involve questing and slaying monsters, but there’s also a lot of travel. Travel earns you little experience (you do gain a bit for discovering new areas), so it’s wise to keep travel to a minimum. The new level scaling system, which scales zones to your level within a preset range, helps with that. You can choose what zones you want to experience and stick with them until you finish their quests.
Unlike regular games, MMORPG don’t have a single player mode offline. During the game you need to be connected to the Internet. This doesn’t mean that you won’t be able to play by yourself: World of Warcraft offers a variety of options for playing the game alone. But there are other adventurers in the virtual world and if you want to share the fun of the game, you must be connected to the Internet. The main part of the game focuses on a group of players, who explore dangerous dungeons and defeat powerful monsters together, helping each other.
A central problem of long-running MMOs like WoW is that the player's numbers have to continuously get bigger and bigger in order for the player to feel more powerful. When the original game released back in 2004, player health pools topped out in the thousands of hit points. Today, everyone is running around with absolutely massive numbers on their stat sheets, many of which have climbed into the millions. Players can deal out an equally massive amount of damage and it's gotten to the point where there are so many large numbers flashing across the screen during combat that it can be hard to keep track of exactly how well you are performing.
Some dungeons are also much better than other. Some take a long time to finish and some are quick. Some have few quests and others have many. The ideal dungeons have a lot of quests and are quick to finish. If you are sent to a long dungeon that you have already completed, you can leave but you won’t be able to enter a new dungeon in 30 minutes. Dungeons like the Stockade are super quick, so it will still be good XP if you are sent here more than once.
These are a genuinely challenging and dynamic way to play. No two are alike, and the A.I. actually does give you some real opposition. Island expeditions are like dungeons, available in normal, heroic, and mythic difficulties. That means you can press into higher difficulties for more of a challenge. Of course, the PvP version pushes everything to the max. 

Elixirs serve the same purpose as Flasks, but the buff expires if you die. You'll only use these between 1-70, generally speaking, until you can start buying Flasks which persist through death. Try not to die, and carry extras just in case. If you can't find an Elixir with the stat you want, look under scrolls, since they count as battle or guardian buffs as well.
When an allied race has been unlocked for a player, new characters from that race will start at level 20. If a player levels an Allied race from 20 to level 110 without using character boosts, they will be rewarded with a unique "Heritage Armor" for transmogrification that reflects the unique lore behind the race but is limited for use to that race. Doing the quests to unlock the allied races will also unlock the races' unique mounts for use by the characters of their faction.[5] The void elves, Lightforged draenei, Highmountain tauren, and Nightborne, as races tied to the storyline for Legion, were made available with the preorder on January 30, 2018.[7] The Dark Iron dwarves and the Mag'har orcs are made available upon completing the "War Campaign" in Kul Tiras and Zandalar and reaching Exalted with one faction's War Campaign reputation; the Kul Tiran humans and Zandalari will be made available later in the expansion. Game director Ion Hazzikostas also indicated that additional Allied Races may be available in the future.[8]
I do not recommend going for TBC, although I remember Hellfire peninsula to be decent, everything else is rather slow. Instead go for WotLK, Borean Thundra gets you levelled very fast, and then you can head straight for Icecrown at 67, which is also insanely fast, although admittedly has a few elite quests. You can go to Sholazar Basin alternatively. 2 zones should get you 60-80 no problem.
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