It's hard to step out of the shadow of Legion, which was utterly fantastic in almost every way, to enter an expansion where you get one item per boss in the last expansion because the rules have been changed to force more grinding, where you have to grind reputation in the old expansion that you probably skipped because rep grinds suck JUST to unlock allied races (who aren't fully unique races since they recycle old content such as animations), where questing has SOMEHOW become boring again and where your new abilities are given by items you'll swap out every level, meanwhile being only boring passive effects no one cares about.
For Alliance it's Lok'Modan, Redridge, Darkshore, Felwood, Stranglethorn (both parts), Plaguelands. Somewhere between 3 - 3.5 of these get you to 60 in like a 16 hours /played, if you queue for dungeons at the same time. I recommend dropping everything at 45 and going to Darkshore-Felwood if you didn't do them yet - they are literally the fastest levelling zones in the game right now, maybe only trumped by Silverpine.
 Nightborne - "Isolated behind a protective barrier for 10,000 years, the elves of Suramar grew increasingly dependent upon the arcane magic of the Nightwell. To protect this font of power, the leaders of the Nightborne struck a bargain with the Burning Legion that plunged their kingdom into civil war. After fighting for freedom from their demonic masters, the Nightborne seek allies in the Horde to help them reclaim their place in the world."

Anyway, however you choose to get to the addon's menu, choose guide list and then pick the zone you want to quest in. There are some zones that will autoselect based on quests in your log, but not all guides or all quests are set up that way. (If you don't want to switch to a guide that auto-pops up choose "not now" or "never") As you can see in the screenshot, there are various categories of guides. Most max level content (such as Argus) is found in Achievements rather than leveling.
And... that was it. New NPCs offered a glimpse of some truly amazing armor and weapons, none of which are currently available to players (and datamining suggests it may be a while, if ever, before they are.) There were no new appearances for players to farm, no items or pets or toys or titles to obtain, no achievements to complete. There was no repeatable, truly farmable content.

Warfronts are larger, 20-man challenges that take inspiration from the Warcraft strategy games. Players are deployed on the Warfront to collect resources, destroy enemy troops, construct buildings, and eventually launch an assault to take over the enemy base. These battles take 20 to 40 minutes to complete and, unlike Island Expeditions, don’t offer a PvP mode.
EXPLORE TWO FABLED KINGDOMS – As a champion of the Horde, travel to Zandalar to persuade the trolls to lend their naval might to the war effort. As a defender of the Alliance, sail to the seafaring kingdom of Kul Tiras, home of Jaina Proudmoore, and rally its inhabitants to fight for your cause. Once you’ve successfully recruited one of these proud kingdoms to your faction, infiltrate the enemy’s newly claimed territory.
The Heart of Azeroth is an artifact given to the player character from the world soul via Magni Bronzebeard. It is a necklace that can use the power of Azerite, the lifeblood of the embryonic titan Azeroth (See Plot, below). Azerite is similar in function to Legion's artifact power, in that it is gathered normally from playing the game and is used to upgrade an artifact; likewise, the Heart is similar in function to Legion's artifact weapons by having the capacity to be constantly upgraded. Unlike artifact weapons, however, the Heart is shared with all of the player's specializations and can empower all eligible pieces worn simultaneously.
If you’re jumping back in for Battle for Azeroth, we recommend checking out the big “what to do first” guide from Wowhead. You’re also going to want to brush up on specific advice for your class—both Icy Veins and Wowhead have incredibly detailed guides for all of the game’s combinations of classes and specializations. Make sure you go in and figure out all the new (or changed) talents you’ll be using, and start to memorize a typical combat rotation so you don’t die nearly as much in game’s latest incarnation.
First, a bit of context: I've been playing the game since six months before it was originally released, and I make no apologies about liking it. It's getting long in the tooth, as with all games that have been on the market for 14 years, but Blizzard seems committed to continuous improvement. The last expansion, Legion, was the best the company had ever released. (Stop arguing, Wrath of the Lich King fan boys. It's true and you know it.)
There are other in-game guides out there such as Xcelerated, but it doesn’t even come close to what Dugi and Zygor offer.  Although I’m obviously a fan of Dugi Guides, I have given a fair side by side comparison of each guide, based on facts and what is offered by each. I’ve included many screenshots to give you an idea of how each guide looks and works within the game. I will do my best to keep this as up to date as possible, with price changes, guide updates etc as I know how annoying it is reading outdated reviews.
It's hard to step out of the shadow of Legion, which was utterly fantastic in almost every way, to enter an expansion where you get one item per boss in the last expansion because the rules have been changed to force more grinding, where you have to grind reputation in the old expansion that you probably skipped because rep grinds suck JUST to unlock allied races (who aren't fully unique races since they recycle old content such as animations), where questing has SOMEHOW become boring again and where your new abilities are given by items you'll swap out every level, meanwhile being only boring passive effects no one cares about.
The Alliance are able to unlock the void elves (exiled blood elves who can tap into shadow magic, trained by Alleria Windrunner after her experiences on Argus), Lightforged draenei (draenei members of the Army of the Light who fought the Legion on Argus), Dark Iron dwarves (fire-blooded cousins of the in-game dwarves of Ironforge), and Kul Tiran humans (larger, more heavyset versions of the in-game humans of Stormwind).[6]
What’s worse, it’s rarely satisfying when you do make it to a new milestone in your grind to unlock the gear you need. Legion had legendary items that changed the way an ability functioned, which would also completely change the way classes played; the Azerite traits in the Battle for Azeroth are rarely as interesting. Instead, they are simply passive bonuses that, in most cases, help you do more damage without any extra effort on your part. While some classes are lucky enough to have traits that change their gameplay slightly, Blizzard has so far seemed to favor nerfing those traits out of viability for most specs.

I also noticed that the slowdowns were heating up my graphics card (a GTX1080 with good cooling and a well-configured fan curve). On high but not max settings, I would always hover around 60-65 degrees C, and thought this was normal. After turning auto zoom off, I noticed that my card never gets past 49 degrees C. I'm pretty shocked, as it's a very hot day where I am and I didn't know one feature could affect temps so much. I didn't know my temps could even get that low! Even on full max settings (with 200% resolution scaling etc.), it now can't go over 66 degrees, whereas it used to go up to 74 degrees at times when auto zoom was on.

I do not recommend going for TBC, although I remember Hellfire peninsula to be decent, everything else is rather slow. Instead go for WotLK, Borean Thundra gets you levelled very fast, and then you can head straight for Icecrown at 67, which is also insanely fast, although admittedly has a few elite quests. You can go to Sholazar Basin alternatively. 2 zones should get you 60-80 no problem.
×