Class abilities were reworked dramatically across the board, with some still needing a serious balance pass. That left many players not only feeling underpowered, but having to learn how to play their characters all over again. Bosses in large-group raid dungeons that were easily killed each week by experienced guilds of players suddenly became challenging again, or worse, completely unkillable, halting forward momentum on old content for a good chunk of the high-end player base.
Azerite equipment is currently balanced around being able to unlock the outermost, earliest tier of power immediately upon acquisition, while delaying further advancement until the Heart has been further empowered. For example, the first piece of Azerite equipment, gained shortly after the Heart itself, is fully empowered once the Heart of Azeroth has reached level 3. A character at 120 (the maximum for the expansion) may find a piece whose first tier requires the Heart to have grown to level 12 or greater.

Both Zygor and Dugi guides are very in-depth in-game addons and they are very straightforward, yet extremely efficient to use with step-by-step instructions. The guides are being constantly updated to keep leveling and all the other guides at the most optimal rate, so you can use them for the latest Battle for Azeroth expansion! Zygor and Dugi guides are quite similar to each other, the only major difference being the GUI and a few features. Let’s have a closer look at the GUI differences.


There’s a lot of #content in the new expansion. It’s mostly locked behind a variety of gates, some of which players can’t even control. Warfronts are the best example. You might assume joining a Warfront is a simple matter of opening the group finder. Wrong! Warfronts are only accessible for a week at a time. It’s not precisely clear how often that week will come around (it’s based both on a time gate and on the opposing faction gathering resources) but, as of right now, it looks likely to be available just one week out of every four. 

No matter your experience level—whether you’re about to experience the thrill of hearing the Stormwind City theme as you walk through its epic gates for the first time, or whether you can spell Ahn’Qiraj off the top of your head—here are some tips and suggestions for making the most of your new life in the World of Warcraft (or your epic, Illidan-like return to Azeroth.)
This leaves players chasing an endless loop of trying to get higher level Azerite gear — which can only reliably be gained through raids and isn’t available in Mythic+ — but only the pieces with exactly the right traits will actually be an upgrade. It’s even possible that some items that should be huge upgrades are nullified by the loss of a specific trait that makes one ability do more damage than the others.

Unfortunately, the BfA prepatch took away more than usual--having an entire expansion balanced around an ultra-powerful weapon that abruptly turned into a dead stat stick made the end of Legion particularly depressing--and offered very little in return. The patch didn't flop because of bugs; it failed because it's boring, unrewarding, limited, unambitious, and actively feels like it's punishing players at a time they should be celebrating.

Havoc in Battle for Azeroth has gone through somewhat of a maturing process, trying to focus more on the talent tree and allowing for more diverse options in gameplay approaches, alongside tightening up some of the more loose aspects of the original implementation. It still remains a predominantly builder spender style rotation and is largely Global Cooldown locked. The core hook is making the most of your Fury pool and reacting to unpredictable gains, ensuring you use high burst cooldowns and windows to push yourself even further. On top of that, it comes with a variety of mobility and defense tools, creating a versatile toolkit with some unique abilities that can be used in a variety of ways.
On January 30, 2018 Battle for Azeroth was made available for preorder, coming with the unlocking of the four first allied races. With the announcement of the Collector's Edition and release date for Battle for Azeroth on April 5, 2018,[3][5] Legion was the first expansion to be offered for free with a preorder.[6] Battle for Azeroth is the first expansion to launch in the Americas, Europe, Taiwan, Korea, and Australia/New Zealand at the same time.[1] Battle for Azeroth became the fastest-selling World of Warcraft expansion ever.[7]
I made some route changes to the Horde levels 43-44 sections.  I have swapped 44 Dustwallow Marsh with 44 Desolace (the entire sections). This allowed me to do Deadmire (at lvl 43 instead of 38) and then go stop at TB to turn in Deadmire + The Black Shield at the same time, then fly quickly to do the Desolace stuff.  Doing 44 Desolace is now mandatory because I think its faster with the new routes. This will also make the level 53 grind much shorter.  I think these were great changes.
But one major question that keeps popping up as players reach the level cap is, "what do I do when I hit Level 120?". On the surface, it would seem pretty simple that your next steps would be gearing up to raid. However, BfA doesn’t exactly make it clear how to go about doing that, and there are more options for future raiders and dungeoneers than ever before when it comes to endgame content.
Tiragarde Sound and Stormsong Valley are both fairly similar zones, but Stormsong is a little longer, meaning that you might not even have to finish it to hit 120. Tiragarde also comes with a bit of a warning. There are plenty of side quests to do in the zone after you finish the story quests. Don’t do them. It’s not worth the time or the experience you’ll get.
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