Through out the game, the quest log will be capped to 20 many times.  The guide makes use of maximizing the total amount of quests you can accept at once.  Because of this it is important to follow the guide exactly and only accept quests if the guide tells you to so you won't run into issues not being able to accept a quest.  If you do accept a quest that is not listed in the guide, write it down because you may need to abandon it in order to keep following the guide if your quest log is full.

And... that was it. New NPCs offered a glimpse of some truly amazing armor and weapons, none of which are currently available to players (and datamining suggests it may be a while, if ever, before they are.) There were no new appearances for players to farm, no items or pets or toys or titles to obtain, no achievements to complete. There was no repeatable, truly farmable content.
The raid is made up of eight bosses that each have interesting and unique mechanics. Some bosses might put extra pressure on the DPS players to kill an add before it can heal the boss, while others might require players to move around the environment in a specific pattern or order, all the while still doing as much damage to the boss as possible or keeping the group alive through healing. While past raids often repeated mechanics or had one or two boring fights that didn’t ask much of the players, each encounter in Uldir feels unique and challenging. It’s been a long time since we had a raid where each fight was as much fun to do over and over again as the fights in Uldir.
 ":"  -  Any time a step ends in a ":" instead of a "." means that the next step is part of the current step you are on.  This generally means the next step should be done while working on the current step.  This means every "start working on" or "continue working on" will end in a ":".  But this is used with other occasions as well, so keep this in mind.
Since it's like a premium version and it's not modifying game files it gets by somehow. I personally hate Zygor's guides and always have, it's just personal honestly. I understand some people like his guides and have no problem paying for them but I personally hate the idea of charging someone for an addon that - as this post points out - has plenty of bugs in it. These were fixed last week and if I'm paying cash for an addon I want that addon bug free and not causing a hassle and taking my time away when I could be doing a better job without an addon at all.
If you’re a returning player, consider paying for a month’s worth of playing time—a mere $15—and using the game’s newer Class Trials to see if you still have that spark for higher-level play. While you can also go the “Starter Edition” route for a free, limited romp through Azeroth, you might need a little more than the newbie zones to help you decide whether you want to play through the game’s latest expansion.
But the system offers a painful and mindless grind. At worst, it feels like a cheap and artificial wall blocking you from playing your character to its full potential. Levels of your heart come fast at first, but the costs become prohibitive when you get up into level 20 or so. This wouldn’t be an issue if the most powerful Azerite gear didn’t require reaching level 22 to unlock even 75 percent of their full damage, leaving players left out of features from gear they’ve already collected. This means more grinding.
And... that was it. New NPCs offered a glimpse of some truly amazing armor and weapons, none of which are currently available to players (and datamining suggests it may be a while, if ever, before they are.) There were no new appearances for players to farm, no items or pets or toys or titles to obtain, no achievements to complete. There was no repeatable, truly farmable content.
Class abilities were reworked dramatically across the board, with some still needing a serious balance pass. That left many players not only feeling underpowered, but having to learn how to play their characters all over again. Bosses in large-group raid dungeons that were easily killed each week by experienced guilds of players suddenly became challenging again, or worse, completely unkillable, halting forward momentum on old content for a good chunk of the high-end player base.

 Lightforged draenei - "For untold millennia, the Army of the Light waged war against the Burning Legion throughout the Twisting Nether. The draenei most committed to their long crusade would undergo a ritual to become Lightforged, infusing their bodies with the very essence of the Holy Light. After finally achieving victory on Argus, the Lightforged Draenei have undertaken a new mission: protecting Azeroth from rising threats and helping the Alliance push back against Horde aggression."
 ":"  -  Any time a step ends in a ":" instead of a "." means that the next step is part of the current step you are on.  This generally means the next step should be done while working on the current step.  This means every "start working on" or "continue working on" will end in a ":".  But this is used with other occasions as well, so keep this in mind.
These stat priorities help to get a rough idea of what gear to go for, but the most important thing to get as soon as possible is your stat weights. Stat weights help you zero in on which stat is the most effective at increasing your healing. However, healers have no grand simulator, as there are a lot more variables that can affect your overall performance than there are for DPS specs. In light of that, healers use fight analysis tools like WoWAnalyzer and the Teachings of the Red Crane spreadsheet that takes logs from WarcraftLogs and gives you accurate weights that would improve your output.
But the system offers a painful and mindless grind. At worst, it feels like a cheap and artificial wall blocking you from playing your character to its full potential. Levels of your heart come fast at first, but the costs become prohibitive when you get up into level 20 or so. This wouldn’t be an issue if the most powerful Azerite gear didn’t require reaching level 22 to unlock even 75 percent of their full damage, leaving players left out of features from gear they’ve already collected. This means more grinding.

On January 30, 2018 Battle for Azeroth was made available for preorder, coming with the unlocking of the four first allied races. With the announcement of the Collector's Edition and release date for Battle for Azeroth on April 5, 2018,[3][5] Legion was the first expansion to be offered for free with a preorder.[6] Battle for Azeroth is the first expansion to launch in the Americas, Europe, Taiwan, Korea, and Australia/New Zealand at the same time.[1] Battle for Azeroth became the fastest-selling World of Warcraft expansion ever.[7]
For collecting artifact power to level up your Heart of Azeroth necklace, island expeditions are unbeatable. There’s a weekly Azerite goal that you need to meet through the expeditions, and when you do, you’ll be awarded 2500 artifact power. There’s a small chance that you’ll get weapons from completing expeditions too, but they’re not a reliable source of gear.

Each of those modes existed long before this latest expansion; raiding is a basic concept in MMOs, and Mythic+ was added in World of Warcraft’s last expansion. The problems with Battle for Azeroth’s endgame come from the systems it adds, which most often artificially gate progress where most of the fun can be found. If raids and Mythic+ are the carrot, we’re about to talk about the stick.
The game guide to the World of Warcraft Battle for Azeroth is a handy set of practical advice and guidelines that will help you in getting answers to the most important questions about the new expansion. Battle for Azeroth is the latest expansion set to the much-loved MMO game. Since its launch the game has collected great reviews and everything indicates that Blizzard has delivered another exquisite in-game content for months to come.
No matter your experience level—whether you’re about to experience the thrill of hearing the Stormwind City theme as you walk through its epic gates for the first time, or whether you can spell Ahn’Qiraj off the top of your head—here are some tips and suggestions for making the most of your new life in the World of Warcraft (or your epic, Illidan-like return to Azeroth.)

While it’s clear that Blizzard is eager not to spoil the future of Battle for Azeroth, it seems pretty unlikely that players who want to be pure evil will ever get their day to shine in World of Warcraft. Despite the decision being added into the game, the good guys will likely win and the threats to Azeroth will continue to roll on by, getting knocked out by players one at a time.


-New dungeons- About 3/4 are fairly decent, not too long not too short, but none of them are compelling, none make me say to my friends and guildies, "Hey, let's do this instance, I love the theme and encounters." They're dull but tolerable. The other 1/4 of the dungeons just aren't fun and you will groan when you get a mythic Keystone for the Underrot, the snake temple, or Waycrest Manor. Waycrest Manor is actually one of the better dungeons, however, with the new Infested affix, Waycrest Manor suffers from many game-breaking bugs that end in the entire instance being pulled due to doors not properly working as intended.
Unfortunately, the BfA prepatch took away more than usual--having an entire expansion balanced around an ultra-powerful weapon that abruptly turned into a dead stat stick made the end of Legion particularly depressing--and offered very little in return. The patch didn't flop because of bugs; it failed because it's boring, unrewarding, limited, unambitious, and actively feels like it's punishing players at a time they should be celebrating.

And... that was it. New NPCs offered a glimpse of some truly amazing armor and weapons, none of which are currently available to players (and datamining suggests it may be a while, if ever, before they are.) There were no new appearances for players to farm, no items or pets or toys or titles to obtain, no achievements to complete. There was no repeatable, truly farmable content.
Similar problems have risen in the leveling system, which automatically scales to the player’s level and equipment. For the most part, you’ll vaporize enemies more quickly as you gain power, but there are some weird dips. Many players complained they felt less powerful at level 119 than at level 110, a problem I experienced myself. And world PvP remains a strange and whacky world where level and class balance issues make wins and losses feel destined instead of earned.
I personally wouldn't recommend Bloodmyst Isle. There's a ton of quests but a lot of those quests have absolutely horrible drop rates on their items. A lot of the quest mobs also have very slow and/or spread out spawns so if there's other people there you're gonna be waiting for respawns or spending a lot of time traveling between spawn areas quite a bit. Overall it's just an incredibly slow zone as far as EXP goes.
Just like player item levels, the game's professions have become pretty bloated over time. Blizzard has made some updates to the leveling process before but Battle for Azeroth features a skill squish that should smooth things out considerably. Instead of having to level hundreds of points before you can start crafting Battle for Azeroth items, each expansion will have its own separate skill tier. In other words, you can start crafting Battle for Azeroth content right away, while the gear and items from other expansions will each feature their own separate counters. Your first Battle for Azeroth item will put you at 1/150 on the counter for the new expansion, no more grinding needed.
Take breaks. Unless you're straight up no-lifing it over a weekend or something, this leveling process is going to take ~40 hours. But any time you do need to step away, log out. That tiny little bit of rested exp is insignificant...but you never know when something might come up and you'll have to leave for a longer period of time than you expected. Better to be logged out and safe(especially with War Mode on) than AFK waiting for a d/c. Plus, you'll need to stretch, eat, shower, and maybe sleep. XD
That’s because armor of higher level has higher Azerite power requirements than lower level armor. That means a shiny new piece of Epic gear will have better stats but, unless you’ve been diligent about your Azerite power grind, won’t have as many traits unlocked. You lose options as you earn better gear. Eventually, you’ll grind out enough Azerite to earn those traits back, but you’re left with limited customization until then.
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